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Critical windows for maternal fine particulate matter exposure and adverse birth outcomes: The Shanghai birth cohort study.
Chemosphere. 2020 Feb; 240:124904.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prenatal exposure to ambient levels of air pollution has been reported to adversely affect birth outcomes, yet few studies have investigated refined susceptible windows for adverse birth outcomes.

OBJECTIVES

The study aimed at estimating associations between maternal exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5; particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) and birth outcomes, including birth weight, low birth weight (LBW) and preterm birth (PTB), and identify specific susceptible windows.

METHODS

A total of 3692 singleton live births were enrolled between 2013 and 2016 in Shanghai Birth Cohort, China. Based on mothers' residential addresses, weekly mean concentrations of PM2.5 over gestation were estimated based on an incorporated evaluating approach combining satellite-based estimates and ground-level measurements. Distributed lag non-liner models (DLNMs) were fitted by incorporating with multiple liner models and Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate weekly-as well as trimester-exposure-lag-response associations between average PM2.5 level and birth weight, LBW and PTB, and to identify critical windows.

RESULTS

In this study, gestational exposure to PM2.5 was associated with adverse birth outcomes in infants, and critical windows were identified as 31st-34th gestational weeks for reduced birth weight, 38th-42 nd weeks for LBW and 27th-30th weeks for PTB, respectively. Trimester-specific associations were found for all birth outcomes during the third trimester.

CONCLUSIONS

Ambient PM2.5 exposure exhibited adverse impacts on multiple outcomes including reduced birth weight, LBW and PTB in the late pregnancy. The study provides further evidence supporting harmful effects of maternal PM2.5 exposure on birth outcomes and identifying critical windows.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA.Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: khan@fudan.edu.cn.Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: gaoyu_ciel@sjtu.edu.cn.Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; MOE and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, Xin Hua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: tianmiejp@sjtu.edu.cn.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31550593

Citation

Yuan, Lei, et al. "Critical Windows for Maternal Fine Particulate Matter Exposure and Adverse Birth Outcomes: the Shanghai Birth Cohort Study." Chemosphere, vol. 240, 2020, p. 124904.
Yuan L, Zhang Y, Wang W, et al. Critical windows for maternal fine particulate matter exposure and adverse birth outcomes: The Shanghai birth cohort study. Chemosphere. 2020;240:124904.
Yuan, L., Zhang, Y., Wang, W., Chen, R., Liu, Y., Liu, C., Kan, H., Gao, Y., & Tian, Y. (2020). Critical windows for maternal fine particulate matter exposure and adverse birth outcomes: The Shanghai birth cohort study. Chemosphere, 240, 124904. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.124904
Yuan L, et al. Critical Windows for Maternal Fine Particulate Matter Exposure and Adverse Birth Outcomes: the Shanghai Birth Cohort Study. Chemosphere. 2020;240:124904. PubMed PMID: 31550593.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Critical windows for maternal fine particulate matter exposure and adverse birth outcomes: The Shanghai birth cohort study. AU - Yuan,Lei, AU - Zhang,Yan, AU - Wang,Weidong, AU - Chen,Renjie, AU - Liu,Yang, AU - Liu,Cong, AU - Kan,Haidong, AU - Gao,Yu, AU - Tian,Ying, AU - ,, Y1 - 2019/09/18/ PY - 2019/06/17/received PY - 2019/09/02/revised PY - 2019/09/17/accepted PY - 2019/9/25/pubmed PY - 2020/1/4/medline PY - 2019/9/25/entrez KW - Air pollution KW - Birth outcomes KW - China KW - Cohort study KW - Fine particulate matter SP - 124904 EP - 124904 JF - Chemosphere JO - Chemosphere VL - 240 N2 - BACKGROUND: Prenatal exposure to ambient levels of air pollution has been reported to adversely affect birth outcomes, yet few studies have investigated refined susceptible windows for adverse birth outcomes. OBJECTIVES: The study aimed at estimating associations between maternal exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5; particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) and birth outcomes, including birth weight, low birth weight (LBW) and preterm birth (PTB), and identify specific susceptible windows. METHODS: A total of 3692 singleton live births were enrolled between 2013 and 2016 in Shanghai Birth Cohort, China. Based on mothers' residential addresses, weekly mean concentrations of PM2.5 over gestation were estimated based on an incorporated evaluating approach combining satellite-based estimates and ground-level measurements. Distributed lag non-liner models (DLNMs) were fitted by incorporating with multiple liner models and Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate weekly-as well as trimester-exposure-lag-response associations between average PM2.5 level and birth weight, LBW and PTB, and to identify critical windows. RESULTS: In this study, gestational exposure to PM2.5 was associated with adverse birth outcomes in infants, and critical windows were identified as 31st-34th gestational weeks for reduced birth weight, 38th-42 nd weeks for LBW and 27th-30th weeks for PTB, respectively. Trimester-specific associations were found for all birth outcomes during the third trimester. CONCLUSIONS: Ambient PM2.5 exposure exhibited adverse impacts on multiple outcomes including reduced birth weight, LBW and PTB in the late pregnancy. The study provides further evidence supporting harmful effects of maternal PM2.5 exposure on birth outcomes and identifying critical windows. SN - 1879-1298 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31550593/Critical_windows_for_maternal_fine_particulate_matter_exposure_and_adverse_birth_outcomes:_The_Shanghai_birth_cohort_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0045-6535(19)32143-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -