Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Conflicting influences of justice motivations on moral judgments.
Cogn Emot. 2020 06; 34(4):670-683.CE

Abstract

Humans are motivated by justice concerns, yet vary in their reactions to observing or experiencing injustice. At a proximate level, approach and avoidance represent core fundamental motivational systems which have been proposed to be involved in two independent moral systems: a prescriptive system responsive to obligations ("shoulds") and a proscriptive system concerned with prohibitions ("should nots"). It is unclear whether these motivational systems or personal involvement better explain the influence of justice dispositions on moral judgments. To clarify this theoretical argument, two experiments examined how dispositional self-oriented and other-oriented justice sensitivity influence condemnation of prescriptive and proscriptive violations while manipulating perspective between-subject or within-subject. Participants rated the permissibility of everyday moral transgressions, from the perspective of the victim or a neutral observer. In Study 1 (n = 235), self-oriented dispositions increased and other-oriented dispositions decreased the probability of rating prescriptive violations as permissible. Study 2 (n = 468) replicated the effect of other-oriented justice sensitivity. Overall, these results bridge the gap between motivational systems and self-other processing. They suggest that justice sensitivity is better conceptualised as distinct motivations which can exert opposing influences on moral decision-making. Moreover, personal involvement may not be as important as individual justice motivations for explaining everyday moral decision-making.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31556353

Citation

Yoder, Keith J., and Jean Decety. "Conflicting Influences of Justice Motivations On Moral Judgments." Cognition & Emotion, vol. 34, no. 4, 2020, pp. 670-683.
Yoder KJ, Decety J. Conflicting influences of justice motivations on moral judgments. Cogn Emot. 2020;34(4):670-683.
Yoder, K. J., & Decety, J. (2020). Conflicting influences of justice motivations on moral judgments. Cognition & Emotion, 34(4), 670-683. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2019.1669536
Yoder KJ, Decety J. Conflicting Influences of Justice Motivations On Moral Judgments. Cogn Emot. 2020;34(4):670-683. PubMed PMID: 31556353.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Conflicting influences of justice motivations on moral judgments. AU - Yoder,Keith J, AU - Decety,Jean, Y1 - 2019/09/26/ PY - 2019/9/27/pubmed PY - 2020/12/22/medline PY - 2019/9/27/entrez KW - Empathic concern KW - justice motivation KW - prescriptive morality KW - proscriptive morality KW - social decision-making SP - 670 EP - 683 JF - Cognition & emotion JO - Cogn Emot VL - 34 IS - 4 N2 - Humans are motivated by justice concerns, yet vary in their reactions to observing or experiencing injustice. At a proximate level, approach and avoidance represent core fundamental motivational systems which have been proposed to be involved in two independent moral systems: a prescriptive system responsive to obligations ("shoulds") and a proscriptive system concerned with prohibitions ("should nots"). It is unclear whether these motivational systems or personal involvement better explain the influence of justice dispositions on moral judgments. To clarify this theoretical argument, two experiments examined how dispositional self-oriented and other-oriented justice sensitivity influence condemnation of prescriptive and proscriptive violations while manipulating perspective between-subject or within-subject. Participants rated the permissibility of everyday moral transgressions, from the perspective of the victim or a neutral observer. In Study 1 (n = 235), self-oriented dispositions increased and other-oriented dispositions decreased the probability of rating prescriptive violations as permissible. Study 2 (n = 468) replicated the effect of other-oriented justice sensitivity. Overall, these results bridge the gap between motivational systems and self-other processing. They suggest that justice sensitivity is better conceptualised as distinct motivations which can exert opposing influences on moral decision-making. Moreover, personal involvement may not be as important as individual justice motivations for explaining everyday moral decision-making. SN - 1464-0600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31556353/Conflicting_influences_of_justice_motivations_on_moral_judgments_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02699931.2019.1669536 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -