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Cigarette smoking and oral microbiota in low-income and African-American populations.
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2019 12; 73(12):1108-1115.JE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Cigarette smoking is a common risk factor for diseases and cancers. Oral microbiota is also associated with diseases and cancers. However, little is known about the impact of cigarette smoking on the oral microbiota, especially among ethnic minority populations.

METHODS

We investigated cigarette smoking in relationship with the oral microbiota in a large population of predominately low-income and African-American participants. Mouth rinse samples were collected from 1616 participants within the Southern Community Cohort Study, including 592 current-smokers, 477 former-smokers and 547 never-smokers. Oral microbiota was profiled by 16S ribosomal RNA gene deep sequencing.

RESULTS

Current-smokers showed a different overall microbial composition from former-smokers (p=6.62×10-7) and never-smokers (p=6.00×10-8). The two probiotic genera, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, were enriched among current-smokers when compared with never-smokers, with Bonferroni-corrected p values (PBonferroni) of 1.28×10-4 and 5.89×10-7, respectively. The phylum Actinobacteria was also enriched in current-smokers when compared with never-smokers, with a median relative abundance of 12.35% versus 9.36%, respectively, and with a PBonferroni =9.11×10-11. In contrast, the phylum Proteobacteria was depleted in current smokers (PBonferroni =5.57×10-13), with the relative abundance being almost three times that of never-smokers (7.22%) when compared with that of current-smokers (2.47%). Multiple taxa within these two phyla showed differences in abundance/prevalence between current-smokers and never-smokers at PBonferroni <0.05. The differences in the overall microbial composition and abundance/prevalence of most taxa were observed among both African-Americans and European-Americans. Meanwhile, such differences were not observed between former-smokers and never-smokers.

CONCLUSION

Smoking has strong impacts on oral microbial community, which was recovered after smoking cessation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.Department of Pathology, NYU Langone Health, New York City, New York, USA.Rowland Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.International Epidemiology Field Station, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Rockville, Maryland, USA.Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.Department of Biostatistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA jirong.long@vanderbilt.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31563898

Citation

Yang, Yaohua, et al. "Cigarette Smoking and Oral Microbiota in Low-income and African-American Populations." Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, vol. 73, no. 12, 2019, pp. 1108-1115.
Yang Y, Zheng W, Cai QY, et al. Cigarette smoking and oral microbiota in low-income and African-American populations. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2019;73(12):1108-1115.
Yang, Y., Zheng, W., Cai, Q. Y., Shrubsole, M. J., Pei, Z., Brucker, R., Steinwandel, M. D., Bordenstein, S. R., Li, Z., Blot, W. J., Shu, X. O., & Long, J. (2019). Cigarette smoking and oral microbiota in low-income and African-American populations. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 73(12), 1108-1115. https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2019-212474
Yang Y, et al. Cigarette Smoking and Oral Microbiota in Low-income and African-American Populations. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2019;73(12):1108-1115. PubMed PMID: 31563898.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cigarette smoking and oral microbiota in low-income and African-American populations. AU - Yang,Yaohua, AU - Zheng,Wei, AU - Cai,Qiu-Yin, AU - Shrubsole,Martha J, AU - Pei,Zhiheng, AU - Brucker,Robert, AU - Steinwandel,Mark D, AU - Bordenstein,Seth R, AU - Li,Zhigang, AU - Blot,William J, AU - Shu,Xiao-Ou, AU - Long,Jirong, Y1 - 2019/09/28/ PY - 2019/03/28/received PY - 2019/08/26/revised PY - 2019/09/16/accepted PY - 2019/9/30/pubmed PY - 2020/12/18/medline PY - 2019/9/30/entrez KW - African-American KW - European-American KW - cigarette smoking KW - oral microbiota SP - 1108 EP - 1115 JF - Journal of epidemiology and community health JO - J Epidemiol Community Health VL - 73 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is a common risk factor for diseases and cancers. Oral microbiota is also associated with diseases and cancers. However, little is known about the impact of cigarette smoking on the oral microbiota, especially among ethnic minority populations. METHODS: We investigated cigarette smoking in relationship with the oral microbiota in a large population of predominately low-income and African-American participants. Mouth rinse samples were collected from 1616 participants within the Southern Community Cohort Study, including 592 current-smokers, 477 former-smokers and 547 never-smokers. Oral microbiota was profiled by 16S ribosomal RNA gene deep sequencing. RESULTS: Current-smokers showed a different overall microbial composition from former-smokers (p=6.62×10-7) and never-smokers (p=6.00×10-8). The two probiotic genera, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, were enriched among current-smokers when compared with never-smokers, with Bonferroni-corrected p values (PBonferroni) of 1.28×10-4 and 5.89×10-7, respectively. The phylum Actinobacteria was also enriched in current-smokers when compared with never-smokers, with a median relative abundance of 12.35% versus 9.36%, respectively, and with a PBonferroni =9.11×10-11. In contrast, the phylum Proteobacteria was depleted in current smokers (PBonferroni =5.57×10-13), with the relative abundance being almost three times that of never-smokers (7.22%) when compared with that of current-smokers (2.47%). Multiple taxa within these two phyla showed differences in abundance/prevalence between current-smokers and never-smokers at PBonferroni <0.05. The differences in the overall microbial composition and abundance/prevalence of most taxa were observed among both African-Americans and European-Americans. Meanwhile, such differences were not observed between former-smokers and never-smokers. CONCLUSION: Smoking has strong impacts on oral microbial community, which was recovered after smoking cessation. SN - 1470-2738 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31563898/Cigarette_smoking_and_oral_microbiota_in_low_income_and_African_American_populations_ L2 - https://jech.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=31563898 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -