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Chunking and redintegration in verbal short-term memory.

Abstract

Memory for verbal material improves when words form familiar chunks. But how does the improvement due to chunking come about? Two possible explanations are that the input might be actively recoded into chunks, each of which takes up less memory capacity than items not forming part of a chunk (a form of data compression), or that chunking is based on redintegration. If chunking is achieved by redintegration, representations of chunks exist only in long-term memory (LTM) and help to reconstructing degraded traces in short-term memory (STM). In 6 experiments using 2-alternative forced choice recognition and immediate serial recall we find that when chunks are small (2 words) they display a pattern suggestive of redintegration, whereas larger chunks (3 words), show a pattern consistent with data compression. This concurs with previous data showing that there is a cost involved in recoding material into chunks in STM. With smaller chunks this cost seems to outweigh the benefits of recoding words into chunks. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit.Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit.Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31566390

Citation

Norris, Dennis, et al. "Chunking and Redintegration in Verbal Short-term Memory." Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019.
Norris D, Kalm K, Hall J. Chunking and redintegration in verbal short-term memory. J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2019.
Norris, D., Kalm, K., & Hall, J. (2019). Chunking and redintegration in verbal short-term memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition, doi:10.1037/xlm0000762.
Norris D, Kalm K, Hall J. Chunking and Redintegration in Verbal Short-term Memory. J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2019 Sep 30; PubMed PMID: 31566390.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chunking and redintegration in verbal short-term memory. AU - Norris,Dennis, AU - Kalm,Kristjan, AU - Hall,Jane, Y1 - 2019/09/30/ PY - 2019/10/1/entrez PY - 2019/10/1/pubmed PY - 2019/10/1/medline JF - Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition JO - J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn N2 - Memory for verbal material improves when words form familiar chunks. But how does the improvement due to chunking come about? Two possible explanations are that the input might be actively recoded into chunks, each of which takes up less memory capacity than items not forming part of a chunk (a form of data compression), or that chunking is based on redintegration. If chunking is achieved by redintegration, representations of chunks exist only in long-term memory (LTM) and help to reconstructing degraded traces in short-term memory (STM). In 6 experiments using 2-alternative forced choice recognition and immediate serial recall we find that when chunks are small (2 words) they display a pattern suggestive of redintegration, whereas larger chunks (3 words), show a pattern consistent with data compression. This concurs with previous data showing that there is a cost involved in recoding material into chunks in STM. With smaller chunks this cost seems to outweigh the benefits of recoding words into chunks. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved). SN - 1939-1285 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31566390/Chunking_and_redintegration_in_verbal_short-term_memory DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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