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Evoked potentials can predict future disability in people with clinically isolated syndrome.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

The aim was to evaluate whether the addition of evoked potentials (EPs) which evaluate brainstem function to the EP score improves its ability to predict disease progression in people with clinically isolated syndrome (pwCIS).

METHODS

For 94 pwCIS, data on disease activity and progression after 2.9 (1.4-4.1) years of follow-up were available. Baseline characteristics included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters, visual EPs, auditory EPs, somatosensory EPs of the median and tibial nerves, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and tongue somatosensory EPs.

RESULTS

A multivariable regression model including age, sex, total number of T2 lesions on baseline MRI and EP score >13 showed that the total number of T2 lesions on baseline MRI and EP score >13 increase the likelihood for sustained accumulation of disability (SAD). After controlling for age, sex and the total number of T2 lesions on baseline MRI, the hazard of SAD for participants with EP score >13 is 4.093 times that of participants with EP score ≤13. EP score >13 also increases the likelihood for progression measured with a composite measure of progression which uses the Expanded Disability Status Scale, the nine-hole peg test and the timed 25-ft walk (exp(B) = 5.577, 95% confidence interval 1.520-20.468, P = 0.01).

CONCLUSION

The addition of EPs that evaluate brainstem function to the EP score enables prediction of the progression of disability in pwCIS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Referral Center for Autonomic Nervous System Disorders, University Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.Department of Neurology, Referral Center for Autonomic Nervous System Disorders, University Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.Department of Neurology, Referral Center for Autonomic Nervous System Disorders, University Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.Department of Neurology, Referral Center for Autonomic Nervous System Disorders, University Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.Department of Neurology, Referral Center for Autonomic Nervous System Disorders, University Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.Department of Neurology, Referral Center for Autonomic Nervous System Disorders, University Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31574192

Citation

Crnošija, L, et al. "Evoked Potentials Can Predict Future Disability in People With Clinically Isolated Syndrome." European Journal of Neurology, 2019.
Crnošija L, Gabelić T, Barun B, et al. Evoked potentials can predict future disability in people with clinically isolated syndrome. Eur J Neurol. 2019.
Crnošija, L., Gabelić, T., Barun, B., Adamec, I., Krbot Skorić, M., & Habek, M. (2019). Evoked potentials can predict future disability in people with clinically isolated syndrome. European Journal of Neurology, doi:10.1111/ene.14100.
Crnošija L, et al. Evoked Potentials Can Predict Future Disability in People With Clinically Isolated Syndrome. Eur J Neurol. 2019 Oct 1; PubMed PMID: 31574192.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evoked potentials can predict future disability in people with clinically isolated syndrome. AU - Crnošija,L, AU - Gabelić,T, AU - Barun,B, AU - Adamec,I, AU - Krbot Skorić,M, AU - Habek,M, Y1 - 2019/10/01/ PY - 2019/04/14/received PY - 2019/08/07/revised PY - 2019/09/27/accepted PY - 2019/10/2/pubmed PY - 2019/10/2/medline PY - 2019/10/2/entrez KW - EP score KW - clinically isolated syndrome KW - evoked potentials KW - multiple sclerosis KW - progression JF - European journal of neurology JO - Eur. J. Neurol. N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim was to evaluate whether the addition of evoked potentials (EPs) which evaluate brainstem function to the EP score improves its ability to predict disease progression in people with clinically isolated syndrome (pwCIS). METHODS: For 94 pwCIS, data on disease activity and progression after 2.9 (1.4-4.1) years of follow-up were available. Baseline characteristics included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters, visual EPs, auditory EPs, somatosensory EPs of the median and tibial nerves, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and tongue somatosensory EPs. RESULTS: A multivariable regression model including age, sex, total number of T2 lesions on baseline MRI and EP score >13 showed that the total number of T2 lesions on baseline MRI and EP score >13 increase the likelihood for sustained accumulation of disability (SAD). After controlling for age, sex and the total number of T2 lesions on baseline MRI, the hazard of SAD for participants with EP score >13 is 4.093 times that of participants with EP score ≤13. EP score >13 also increases the likelihood for progression measured with a composite measure of progression which uses the Expanded Disability Status Scale, the nine-hole peg test and the timed 25-ft walk (exp(B) = 5.577, 95% confidence interval 1.520-20.468, P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The addition of EPs that evaluate brainstem function to the EP score enables prediction of the progression of disability in pwCIS. SN - 1468-1331 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31574192/Evoked_potentials_can_predict_future_disability_in_people_with_clinically_isolated_syndrome L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ene.14100 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -