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Religious practices and long-term survival after hospital discharge for an acute coronary syndrome.
PLoS One 2019; 14(10):e0223442Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prior studies of healthy populations have found religious practices to be associated with survival. However, no contemporary studies have examined whether religiosity influences survival among patients discharged from the hospital after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The present study examined the relationship between religious practices and 2-year all-cause mortality among hospital survivors of an ACS.

METHODS

Patients hospitalized for an ACS were recruited from 6 medical centers in Massachusetts and Georgia between 2011 and 2013. Study participants self-reported three items assessing religiosity: strength/comfort from religion, petition prayers for health, and awareness of intercessory prayers by others. All cause-mortality within 2-years of hospital discharge was ascertained by review of medical records at participating study hospitals and from death certificates. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the multivariable adjusted risk of 2-year all-cause mortality.

RESULTS

Participants (n = 2,068) were on average 61 years old, 34% were women, and 81% were non-Hispanic White. Approximately 85% derived strength/comfort from religion, 61% prayed for their health, and 89% were aware of intercessions. Overall, 6% died within 2 years post-discharge. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables (age, sex, and race/ethnicity), petition prayers were associated with an increased risk of 2-year all-cause mortality (HR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.01-2.66). With further adjustment for several clinical and psychosocial measures, this association was no longer statistically significant. Strength and comfort from religion and intercessory prayers were not significantly associated with mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

Most ACS survivors acknowledge deriving strength and comfort from religion, praying for their health, and intercessions made by others for their health. Although the reported religious practices were not associated with post-discharge survival after multivariable adjustment, acknowledging that patients utilize their religious beliefs and practices as strategies to improve their health would ensure a more holistic approach to patient management and promote cultural competence in healthcare.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, United States of America.Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.Department of Community Medicine, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, Georgia, United States of America.Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31584980

Citation

Abu, Hawa O., et al. "Religious Practices and Long-term Survival After Hospital Discharge for an Acute Coronary Syndrome." PloS One, vol. 14, no. 10, 2019, pp. e0223442.
Abu HO, Lapane KL, Waring ME, et al. Religious practices and long-term survival after hospital discharge for an acute coronary syndrome. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(10):e0223442.
Abu, H. O., Lapane, K. L., Waring, M. E., Ulbricht, C. M., Devereaux, R. S., McManus, D. D., ... Goldberg, R. J. (2019). Religious practices and long-term survival after hospital discharge for an acute coronary syndrome. PloS One, 14(10), pp. e0223442. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0223442.
Abu HO, et al. Religious Practices and Long-term Survival After Hospital Discharge for an Acute Coronary Syndrome. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(10):e0223442. PubMed PMID: 31584980.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Religious practices and long-term survival after hospital discharge for an acute coronary syndrome. AU - Abu,Hawa O, AU - Lapane,Kate L, AU - Waring,Molly E, AU - Ulbricht,Christine M, AU - Devereaux,Randolph S, AU - McManus,David D, AU - Allison,Jeroan J, AU - Kiefe,Catarina I, AU - Goldberg,Robert J, Y1 - 2019/10/04/ PY - 2019/04/20/received PY - 2019/09/20/accepted PY - 2019/10/5/entrez PY - 2019/10/5/pubmed PY - 2019/10/5/medline SP - e0223442 EP - e0223442 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 14 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Prior studies of healthy populations have found religious practices to be associated with survival. However, no contemporary studies have examined whether religiosity influences survival among patients discharged from the hospital after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The present study examined the relationship between religious practices and 2-year all-cause mortality among hospital survivors of an ACS. METHODS: Patients hospitalized for an ACS were recruited from 6 medical centers in Massachusetts and Georgia between 2011 and 2013. Study participants self-reported three items assessing religiosity: strength/comfort from religion, petition prayers for health, and awareness of intercessory prayers by others. All cause-mortality within 2-years of hospital discharge was ascertained by review of medical records at participating study hospitals and from death certificates. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the multivariable adjusted risk of 2-year all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Participants (n = 2,068) were on average 61 years old, 34% were women, and 81% were non-Hispanic White. Approximately 85% derived strength/comfort from religion, 61% prayed for their health, and 89% were aware of intercessions. Overall, 6% died within 2 years post-discharge. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables (age, sex, and race/ethnicity), petition prayers were associated with an increased risk of 2-year all-cause mortality (HR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.01-2.66). With further adjustment for several clinical and psychosocial measures, this association was no longer statistically significant. Strength and comfort from religion and intercessory prayers were not significantly associated with mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Most ACS survivors acknowledge deriving strength and comfort from religion, praying for their health, and intercessions made by others for their health. Although the reported religious practices were not associated with post-discharge survival after multivariable adjustment, acknowledging that patients utilize their religious beliefs and practices as strategies to improve their health would ensure a more holistic approach to patient management and promote cultural competence in healthcare. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31584980/Religious_practices_and_long-term_survival_after_hospital_discharge_for_an_acute_coronary_syndrome L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0223442 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -