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Evaluating the potential impact of targeted vaccination strategies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreaks in the healthcare setting.
Theor Biol Med Model. 2019 10 07; 16(1):16.TB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) are two coronaviruses with demonstrated potential to generate significant nosocomial outbreaks. In particular, MERS continues to pose a significant threat in the Middle East since 2012. Currently, no licensed vaccine or drug treatment is available to treat patients infected with either coronavirus. However, there are some MERS vaccines in the preclinical stage of development. We sought to evaluate the potential impact of targeted vaccination strategies for mitigating SARS and MERS outbreaks in healthcare settings using simple mathematical models and detailed historic transmission trees describing the progression of past nosocomial outbreaks of SARS and MERS.

RESULTS

Our findings suggest that vaccination strategies targeting patients and healthcare workers, which have been disproportionately affected during past outbreaks, and assuming two vaccination coverage levels at 50 and 75% have the potential to avert nearly 50% or more of MERS or SARS cases.

CONCLUSION

Our modeling results informed by historic outbreak data for SARS and MERS suggest that vaccination strategies targeting patients could be an effective measure to mitigate and prevent outbreaks in the healthcare setting.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 3984, Atlanta, GA, 30302-3984, USA. fabdirizak@gmail.com.Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 3984, Atlanta, GA, 30302-3984, USA.Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 3984, Atlanta, GA, 30302-3984, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31587665

Citation

Abdirizak, Fatima, et al. "Evaluating the Potential Impact of Targeted Vaccination Strategies Against Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Outbreaks in the Healthcare Setting." Theoretical Biology & Medical Modelling, vol. 16, no. 1, 2019, p. 16.
Abdirizak F, Lewis R, Chowell G. Evaluating the potential impact of targeted vaccination strategies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreaks in the healthcare setting. Theor Biol Med Model. 2019;16(1):16.
Abdirizak, F., Lewis, R., & Chowell, G. (2019). Evaluating the potential impact of targeted vaccination strategies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreaks in the healthcare setting. Theoretical Biology & Medical Modelling, 16(1), 16. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12976-019-0112-6
Abdirizak F, Lewis R, Chowell G. Evaluating the Potential Impact of Targeted Vaccination Strategies Against Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Outbreaks in the Healthcare Setting. Theor Biol Med Model. 2019 10 7;16(1):16. PubMed PMID: 31587665.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluating the potential impact of targeted vaccination strategies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreaks in the healthcare setting. AU - Abdirizak,Fatima, AU - Lewis,Rayleen, AU - Chowell,Gerardo, Y1 - 2019/10/07/ PY - 2019/03/18/received PY - 2019/08/28/accepted PY - 2019/10/8/entrez PY - 2019/10/8/pubmed PY - 2020/2/23/medline KW - And infection control and prevention KW - Coronavirus KW - Hospital transmission KW - MERS KW - Middle East KW - Nosocomial KW - SARS KW - South Korea KW - Stochastic simulation KW - Vaccination strategy KW - Vaccine SP - 16 EP - 16 JF - Theoretical biology & medical modelling JO - Theor Biol Med Model VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) are two coronaviruses with demonstrated potential to generate significant nosocomial outbreaks. In particular, MERS continues to pose a significant threat in the Middle East since 2012. Currently, no licensed vaccine or drug treatment is available to treat patients infected with either coronavirus. However, there are some MERS vaccines in the preclinical stage of development. We sought to evaluate the potential impact of targeted vaccination strategies for mitigating SARS and MERS outbreaks in healthcare settings using simple mathematical models and detailed historic transmission trees describing the progression of past nosocomial outbreaks of SARS and MERS. RESULTS: Our findings suggest that vaccination strategies targeting patients and healthcare workers, which have been disproportionately affected during past outbreaks, and assuming two vaccination coverage levels at 50 and 75% have the potential to avert nearly 50% or more of MERS or SARS cases. CONCLUSION: Our modeling results informed by historic outbreak data for SARS and MERS suggest that vaccination strategies targeting patients could be an effective measure to mitigate and prevent outbreaks in the healthcare setting. SN - 1742-4682 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31587665/Evaluating_the_potential_impact_of_targeted_vaccination_strategies_against_severe_acute_respiratory_syndrome_coronavirus__SARS_CoV__and_Middle_East_respiratory_syndrome_coronavirus__MERS_CoV__outbreaks_in_the_healthcare_setting_ L2 - https://tbiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12976-019-0112-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -