Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Duration of post-vaccination humoral immunity against yellow fever in children.
Vaccine. 2019 11 15; 37(48):7147-7154.V

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Vaccination is the most important measure for prevention and control of yellow fever. It is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for residents of endemic areas and travelers to risk areas. In 2013, the WHO discontinued the recommendation of booster doses every 10 years, indicating a single dose as sufficient for lifelong protection.

OBJECTIVE

Considering the lower immune response to YF vaccine in children compared to adults, this study was set out to assess the duration of immunity to YF in children vaccinated in the first two years of life.

METHODS

This cross-sectional study involved children aged 9 months to 12 years with accessible vaccination records recruited in primary care units from a metropolitan area in Southeast Brazil. The serologic status (negative, indeterminate and positive), and geometric mean titers (GMT, inverse dilution) of neutralizing antibodies against YF obtained by Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test was assessed across categories of time after YF vaccination. The strength of association of seropositivity with time was assessed by the odds ratio (OR) taking recent vaccination (1-6 months) as reference.

RESULTS

A total of 824 children recruited from August 2010 to July 2011were tested. The proportion of seropositivity (95% C.I.) and GMT (95% C.I.) dropped markedly across time periods: from 86.7% (80.5-91.4%), GMT 47.9 (38.3-59.9) in newly vaccinated to 59.0% (49.7-67.8%), GMT 14.8 (11.6-19.1) and 42.2% (33.8-51.0), GMT 8.6 (7.1-12.1), respectively in the subgroups vaccinated 31-72 months and 73-100 months before.

CONCLUSIONS

Analogous to previous findings in adults, these data support the need for revaccination of children living in areas with yellow fever virus circulation in humans or in other primates. The data also supported the change of a booster dose to 4 years of age for those primarily vaccinated for yellow fever in the first two years of life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Technology for Immunobiologicals of Bio-Manguinhos/FIOCRUZ, Brazil. Electronic address: tnoronha@bio.fiocruz.br.Institute of Technology for Immunobiologicals of Bio-Manguinhos/FIOCRUZ, Brazil.State Department of Health of Minas Gerais, Brazil.State Department of Health of Minas Gerais, Brazil.Institute of Technology for Immunobiologicals of Bio-Manguinhos/FIOCRUZ, Brazil.René Rachou Research Center/FIOCRUZ, Brazil.René Rachou Research Center/FIOCRUZ, Brazil.Institute of Technology for Immunobiologicals of Bio-Manguinhos/FIOCRUZ, Brazil.Institute of Technology for Immunobiologicals of Bio-Manguinhos/FIOCRUZ, Brazil.Brazilian National School of Public Health/FIOCRUZ, Brazil.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31590934

Citation

de Noronha, Tatiana Guimarães, et al. "Duration of Post-vaccination Humoral Immunity Against Yellow Fever in Children." Vaccine, vol. 37, no. 48, 2019, pp. 7147-7154.
de Noronha TG, de Lourdes de Sousa Maia M, Geraldo Leite Ribeiro J, et al. Duration of post-vaccination humoral immunity against yellow fever in children. Vaccine. 2019;37(48):7147-7154.
de Noronha, T. G., de Lourdes de Sousa Maia, M., Geraldo Leite Ribeiro, J., Campos Lemos, J. A., Maria Barbosa de Lima, S., Martins-Filho, O. A., Campi-Azevedo, A. C., da Silva Freire, M., de Menezes Martins, R., & Bastos Camacho, L. A. (2019). Duration of post-vaccination humoral immunity against yellow fever in children. Vaccine, 37(48), 7147-7154. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.09.051
de Noronha TG, et al. Duration of Post-vaccination Humoral Immunity Against Yellow Fever in Children. Vaccine. 2019 11 15;37(48):7147-7154. PubMed PMID: 31590934.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Duration of post-vaccination humoral immunity against yellow fever in children. AU - de Noronha,Tatiana Guimarães, AU - de Lourdes de Sousa Maia,Maria, AU - Geraldo Leite Ribeiro,José, AU - Campos Lemos,Jandira Aparecida, AU - Maria Barbosa de Lima,Sheila, AU - Martins-Filho,Olindo Assis, AU - Campi-Azevedo,Ana Carolina, AU - da Silva Freire,Marcos, AU - de Menezes Martins,Reinaldo, AU - Bastos Camacho,Luiz Antonio, AU - ,, Y1 - 2019/10/04/ PY - 2019/06/24/received PY - 2019/09/11/revised PY - 2019/09/12/accepted PY - 2019/10/9/pubmed PY - 2020/7/30/medline PY - 2019/10/9/entrez KW - Duration of immunity in children KW - Immunogenicity KW - Vaccination policy KW - Yellow fever vaccine SP - 7147 EP - 7154 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 37 IS - 48 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Vaccination is the most important measure for prevention and control of yellow fever. It is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for residents of endemic areas and travelers to risk areas. In 2013, the WHO discontinued the recommendation of booster doses every 10 years, indicating a single dose as sufficient for lifelong protection. OBJECTIVE: Considering the lower immune response to YF vaccine in children compared to adults, this study was set out to assess the duration of immunity to YF in children vaccinated in the first two years of life. METHODS: This cross-sectional study involved children aged 9 months to 12 years with accessible vaccination records recruited in primary care units from a metropolitan area in Southeast Brazil. The serologic status (negative, indeterminate and positive), and geometric mean titers (GMT, inverse dilution) of neutralizing antibodies against YF obtained by Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test was assessed across categories of time after YF vaccination. The strength of association of seropositivity with time was assessed by the odds ratio (OR) taking recent vaccination (1-6 months) as reference. RESULTS: A total of 824 children recruited from August 2010 to July 2011were tested. The proportion of seropositivity (95% C.I.) and GMT (95% C.I.) dropped markedly across time periods: from 86.7% (80.5-91.4%), GMT 47.9 (38.3-59.9) in newly vaccinated to 59.0% (49.7-67.8%), GMT 14.8 (11.6-19.1) and 42.2% (33.8-51.0), GMT 8.6 (7.1-12.1), respectively in the subgroups vaccinated 31-72 months and 73-100 months before. CONCLUSIONS: Analogous to previous findings in adults, these data support the need for revaccination of children living in areas with yellow fever virus circulation in humans or in other primates. The data also supported the change of a booster dose to 4 years of age for those primarily vaccinated for yellow fever in the first two years of life. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31590934/Duration_of_post_vaccination_humoral_immunity_against_yellow_fever_in_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(19)31260-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -