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Trajectories of Dating Violence Victimization and Perpetration among Rural Adolescents.
J Youth Adolesc. 2019 Dec; 48(12):2360-2376.JY

Abstract

Research is inconclusive about the trajectory of dating violence during adolescence and whether there are differences across gender and race/ethnicity. We examined dating victimization and perpetration trajectories among a diverse sample of rural youth (N = 580, 52.7% female, 49% Black, 39% White, 11% Hispanic or other minorities) in middle and high school who were surveyed annually across four years and explored the influences of gender and ethnicity. The results based on cohort-sequential latent growth modeling revealed that for boys, victimization peaked at 11th grade, and then declined. For girls, victimization was stable throughout adolescence. Perpetration was reported less frequently and increased steadily for males and females. For White youth, victimization peaked at grades 9 and 10, followed by a decline. For Black youth, victimization followed a linear increase. Perpetration trajectory followed a linear increase for White and Black but not Hispanic youth. The findings indicate that the developmental progression of dating violence during adolescence varies by demographics. The discussion focuses on future directions for research on teen dating violence among rural youth and implications for prevention and interventions initiatives.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sociology, Anthropology & Criminal Justice, Clemson University, 321 Brackett Hall, Clemson, SC, 29634, USA. natalls@clemson.edu.School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 29634, USA.Department of Psychology, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 29634, USA.Department of Psychology, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 29634, USA.Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 29634, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31595383

Citation

Sianko, Natallia, et al. "Trajectories of Dating Violence Victimization and Perpetration Among Rural Adolescents." Journal of Youth and Adolescence, vol. 48, no. 12, 2019, pp. 2360-2376.
Sianko N, Kunkel D, Thompson MP, et al. Trajectories of Dating Violence Victimization and Perpetration among Rural Adolescents. J Youth Adolesc. 2019;48(12):2360-2376.
Sianko, N., Kunkel, D., Thompson, M. P., Small, M. A., & McDonell, J. R. (2019). Trajectories of Dating Violence Victimization and Perpetration among Rural Adolescents. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 48(12), 2360-2376. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-019-01132-w
Sianko N, et al. Trajectories of Dating Violence Victimization and Perpetration Among Rural Adolescents. J Youth Adolesc. 2019;48(12):2360-2376. PubMed PMID: 31595383.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trajectories of Dating Violence Victimization and Perpetration among Rural Adolescents. AU - Sianko,Natallia, AU - Kunkel,Deborah, AU - Thompson,Martie P, AU - Small,Mark A, AU - McDonell,James R, Y1 - 2019/10/08/ PY - 2019/07/30/received PY - 2019/09/21/accepted PY - 2019/10/9/pubmed PY - 2020/2/6/medline PY - 2019/10/10/entrez KW - Adolescent dating violence KW - Cohort-sequential design KW - Rural youth KW - Victimization and perpetration trajectories SP - 2360 EP - 2376 JF - Journal of youth and adolescence JO - J Youth Adolesc VL - 48 IS - 12 N2 - Research is inconclusive about the trajectory of dating violence during adolescence and whether there are differences across gender and race/ethnicity. We examined dating victimization and perpetration trajectories among a diverse sample of rural youth (N = 580, 52.7% female, 49% Black, 39% White, 11% Hispanic or other minorities) in middle and high school who were surveyed annually across four years and explored the influences of gender and ethnicity. The results based on cohort-sequential latent growth modeling revealed that for boys, victimization peaked at 11th grade, and then declined. For girls, victimization was stable throughout adolescence. Perpetration was reported less frequently and increased steadily for males and females. For White youth, victimization peaked at grades 9 and 10, followed by a decline. For Black youth, victimization followed a linear increase. Perpetration trajectory followed a linear increase for White and Black but not Hispanic youth. The findings indicate that the developmental progression of dating violence during adolescence varies by demographics. The discussion focuses on future directions for research on teen dating violence among rural youth and implications for prevention and interventions initiatives. SN - 1573-6601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31595383/Trajectories_of_Dating_Violence_Victimization_and_Perpetration_among_Rural_Adolescents_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-019-01132-w DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -