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Adhesion to coral surface as a potential sink for marine microplastics.
Environ Pollut. 2019 Dec; 255(Pt 2):113281.EP

Abstract

Only 1% of plastic entering the ocean is found floating on its surface, with high loads in ocean accumulation zones and semi-enclosed seas, except for the Red Sea, which supports one of the lowest floating plastic loads worldwide. Given the extension of reefs in the Red Sea, we hypothesize a major role of scleractinian corals as sinks, through suspension-feeding, and assessed microplastic removal rates by three Red Sea coral species. Experimental evidence showed removal rates ranging from 0.25 × 10-3 to 14.8 × 10-3 microplastic particles polyp-1 hour-1, among species. However, this was only 2.2 ± 0.6% of the total removal rate, with passive removal through adhesion to the coral surface being 40 times higher than active removal through suspension-feeding. These results point at adhesion of plastic to coral reef structures as a major sink for microplastics suspended in the water column after sinking, helping explain low concentrations in Red Sea surface waters.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Red Sea Research Centre (RSRC) and Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, 23955, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address: Cecilia.martin@kaust.edu.sa.Department of Environmental and Earth Sciences (DISAT), University of Milano - Bicocca, 20126, Milan, Italy.Red Sea Research Centre (RSRC) and Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, 23955, Saudi Arabia.Red Sea Research Centre (RSRC) and Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, 23955, Saudi Arabia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31600700

Citation

Martin, Cecilia, et al. "Adhesion to Coral Surface as a Potential Sink for Marine Microplastics." Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), vol. 255, no. Pt 2, 2019, p. 113281.
Martin C, Corona E, Mahadik GA, et al. Adhesion to coral surface as a potential sink for marine microplastics. Environ Pollut. 2019;255(Pt 2):113281.
Martin, C., Corona, E., Mahadik, G. A., & Duarte, C. M. (2019). Adhesion to coral surface as a potential sink for marine microplastics. Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), 255(Pt 2), 113281. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.113281
Martin C, et al. Adhesion to Coral Surface as a Potential Sink for Marine Microplastics. Environ Pollut. 2019;255(Pt 2):113281. PubMed PMID: 31600700.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adhesion to coral surface as a potential sink for marine microplastics. AU - Martin,Cecilia, AU - Corona,Elena, AU - Mahadik,Gauri A, AU - Duarte,Carlos M, Y1 - 2019/09/21/ PY - 2019/06/25/received PY - 2019/09/03/revised PY - 2019/09/18/accepted PY - 2019/10/11/pubmed PY - 2020/1/17/medline PY - 2019/10/11/entrez KW - Coral reef KW - Ingestion KW - Plastic KW - Red sea KW - Scleractinia SP - 113281 EP - 113281 JF - Environmental pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) JO - Environ Pollut VL - 255 IS - Pt 2 N2 - Only 1% of plastic entering the ocean is found floating on its surface, with high loads in ocean accumulation zones and semi-enclosed seas, except for the Red Sea, which supports one of the lowest floating plastic loads worldwide. Given the extension of reefs in the Red Sea, we hypothesize a major role of scleractinian corals as sinks, through suspension-feeding, and assessed microplastic removal rates by three Red Sea coral species. Experimental evidence showed removal rates ranging from 0.25 × 10-3 to 14.8 × 10-3 microplastic particles polyp-1 hour-1, among species. However, this was only 2.2 ± 0.6% of the total removal rate, with passive removal through adhesion to the coral surface being 40 times higher than active removal through suspension-feeding. These results point at adhesion of plastic to coral reef structures as a major sink for microplastics suspended in the water column after sinking, helping explain low concentrations in Red Sea surface waters. SN - 1873-6424 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31600700/Adhesion_to_coral_surface_as_a_potential_sink_for_marine_microplastics_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0269-7491(19)33379-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -