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Association between dyslipidemia and plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus.
J Clin Lipidol. 2019 Nov - Dec; 13(6):932-939.e2.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) play a key role in energy homeostasis.

OBJECTIVE

We aimed to investigate the association between plasma BCAA levels and dyslipidemia in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus.

METHODS

This cross-sectional study included 4952 participants without diabetes mellitus, enrolled in the Tsuruoka Metabolomic Cohort Study. Plasma BCAA levels were measured by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. Correlations between lipid and BCAA profiles were evaluated by sex-stratified multiple linear regression analyses, after adjusting for confounders. Logistic regression was used to identify associations between BCAAs and metabolic dyslipidemia (MD) defined as triglyceride levels ≥150 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels ≤40 mg/dL for men and ≤50 mg/dL for women, or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels ≥140 mg/dL.

RESULTS

In both sexes, the levels of individual BCAAs and the total BCAA levels correlated positively with triglyceride levels and negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly and positively correlated with LDL-C levels. Increased BCAA levels showed positive associations with MD. However, associations between BCAAs and elevated LDL-C levels were unclear. Furthermore, the associations between BCAA levels and MD regardless of fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels (high or low). Although valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly associated with elevated LDL-C levels in the high-FBS group, no such association was observed in the low-FBS group.

CONCLUSIONS

BCAAs might be associated with MD independently of the FBS level and might play an important role in lipid metabolism and dyslipidemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Cardiology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Student Health Care Center, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan; Faculty of Environment and Information Studies, Keio University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan.Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan; Faculty of Environment and Information Studies, Keio University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan.Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan.Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan.Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan.Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan.Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan; Faculty of Environment and Information Studies, Keio University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan; Graduate School of Health Management, Keio University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan. Electronic address: ttakebayashi@keio.jp.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31601483

Citation

Fukushima, Keiko, et al. "Association Between Dyslipidemia and Plasma Levels of Branched-chain Amino Acids in the Japanese Population Without Diabetes Mellitus." Journal of Clinical Lipidology, vol. 13, no. 6, 2019, pp. 932-939.e2.
Fukushima K, Harada S, Takeuchi A, et al. Association between dyslipidemia and plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus. J Clin Lipidol. 2019;13(6):932-939.e2.
Fukushima, K., Harada, S., Takeuchi, A., Kurihara, A., Iida, M., Fukai, K., Kuwabara, K., Kato, S., Matsumoto, M., Hirata, A., Akiyama, M., Tomita, M., Hirayama, A., Sato, A., Suzuki, C., Sugimoto, M., Soga, T., Sugiyama, D., Okamura, T., & Takebayashi, T. (2019). Association between dyslipidemia and plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus. Journal of Clinical Lipidology, 13(6), 932-e2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacl.2019.09.002
Fukushima K, et al. Association Between Dyslipidemia and Plasma Levels of Branched-chain Amino Acids in the Japanese Population Without Diabetes Mellitus. J Clin Lipidol. 2019 Nov - Dec;13(6):932-939.e2. PubMed PMID: 31601483.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between dyslipidemia and plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus. AU - Fukushima,Keiko, AU - Harada,Sei, AU - Takeuchi,Ayano, AU - Kurihara,Ayako, AU - Iida,Miho, AU - Fukai,Kota, AU - Kuwabara,Kazuyo, AU - Kato,Suzuka, AU - Matsumoto,Minako, AU - Hirata,Aya, AU - Akiyama,Miki, AU - Tomita,Masaru, AU - Hirayama,Akiyoshi, AU - Sato,Asako, AU - Suzuki,Chizuru, AU - Sugimoto,Masahiro, AU - Soga,Tomoyoshi, AU - Sugiyama,Daisuke, AU - Okamura,Tomonori, AU - Takebayashi,Toru, Y1 - 2019/09/11/ PY - 2019/04/07/received PY - 2019/07/10/revised PY - 2019/09/04/accepted PY - 2019/10/12/pubmed PY - 2020/7/21/medline PY - 2019/10/12/entrez KW - BCAA KW - CE-MS KW - Dyslipidemia KW - Metabolic dyslipidemia KW - Metabolomics KW - Sex SP - 932 EP - 939.e2 JF - Journal of clinical lipidology JO - J Clin Lipidol VL - 13 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) play a key role in energy homeostasis. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the association between plasma BCAA levels and dyslipidemia in the Japanese population without diabetes mellitus. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 4952 participants without diabetes mellitus, enrolled in the Tsuruoka Metabolomic Cohort Study. Plasma BCAA levels were measured by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. Correlations between lipid and BCAA profiles were evaluated by sex-stratified multiple linear regression analyses, after adjusting for confounders. Logistic regression was used to identify associations between BCAAs and metabolic dyslipidemia (MD) defined as triglyceride levels ≥150 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels ≤40 mg/dL for men and ≤50 mg/dL for women, or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels ≥140 mg/dL. RESULTS: In both sexes, the levels of individual BCAAs and the total BCAA levels correlated positively with triglyceride levels and negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly and positively correlated with LDL-C levels. Increased BCAA levels showed positive associations with MD. However, associations between BCAAs and elevated LDL-C levels were unclear. Furthermore, the associations between BCAA levels and MD regardless of fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels (high or low). Although valine, leucine, and total BCAA levels were weakly associated with elevated LDL-C levels in the high-FBS group, no such association was observed in the low-FBS group. CONCLUSIONS: BCAAs might be associated with MD independently of the FBS level and might play an important role in lipid metabolism and dyslipidemia. SN - 1933-2874 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31601483/Association_between_dyslipidemia_and_plasma_levels_of_branched_chain_amino_acids_in_the_Japanese_population_without_diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1933-2874(19)30274-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -