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History, clinical findings and outcome of horses with radiographical signs of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis.
Vet Rec 2019VR

Abstract

The progression of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH) has not been completely evaluated, and currently, the only effective treatment is extraction of severely affected teeth. We aim to describe how the disease relates to the history and clinical findings and to report on the outcome in individual horses. This case series comprises data collected from 20 horses (age 14-29 years old) with radiographic findings of EOTRH in their incisor and/or canine teeth. Most horses affected with EOTRH in this study were admitted for dental problems, but some for other complaints such as colic. Of the 288 teeth evaluated radiographically, 224 teeth were abnormal. Radiographic findings were most frequently located in the apical aspect and reserve crown of the teeth, and lesions were also commonly found in clinically normal teeth. Histopathology of extracted teeth showed inflammation in the periodontal ligament and revealed that resorption often extended to the dentine. Some owners were unwilling to allow extraction of their horses' severely affected teeth, even though this treatment has been shown to increase the wellbeing of the horse. As EORTH is a life-long condition, the progression of the disease has to be continuously monitored and the treatments adjusted accordingly.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland vahideh.rahmani@helsinki.fi.Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31601733

Citation

Rahmani, Vahideh, et al. "History, Clinical Findings and Outcome of Horses With Radiographical Signs of Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis." The Veterinary Record, 2019.
Rahmani V, Häyrinen L, Kareinen I, et al. History, clinical findings and outcome of horses with radiographical signs of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis. Vet Rec. 2019.
Rahmani, V., Häyrinen, L., Kareinen, I., & Ruohoniemi, M. (2019). History, clinical findings and outcome of horses with radiographical signs of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis. The Veterinary Record, doi:10.1136/vr.105253.
Rahmani V, et al. History, Clinical Findings and Outcome of Horses With Radiographical Signs of Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis. Vet Rec. 2019 Oct 10; PubMed PMID: 31601733.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - History, clinical findings and outcome of horses with radiographical signs of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis. AU - Rahmani,Vahideh, AU - Häyrinen,Lotta, AU - Kareinen,Ilona, AU - Ruohoniemi,Mirja, Y1 - 2019/10/10/ PY - 2018/11/03/received PY - 2019/07/12/revised PY - 2019/07/29/accepted PY - 2019/10/12/entrez KW - canine tooth KW - dental health KW - horse KW - incisor KW - tooth pain JF - The Veterinary record JO - Vet. Rec. N2 - The progression of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH) has not been completely evaluated, and currently, the only effective treatment is extraction of severely affected teeth. We aim to describe how the disease relates to the history and clinical findings and to report on the outcome in individual horses. This case series comprises data collected from 20 horses (age 14-29 years old) with radiographic findings of EOTRH in their incisor and/or canine teeth. Most horses affected with EOTRH in this study were admitted for dental problems, but some for other complaints such as colic. Of the 288 teeth evaluated radiographically, 224 teeth were abnormal. Radiographic findings were most frequently located in the apical aspect and reserve crown of the teeth, and lesions were also commonly found in clinically normal teeth. Histopathology of extracted teeth showed inflammation in the periodontal ligament and revealed that resorption often extended to the dentine. Some owners were unwilling to allow extraction of their horses' severely affected teeth, even though this treatment has been shown to increase the wellbeing of the horse. As EORTH is a life-long condition, the progression of the disease has to be continuously monitored and the treatments adjusted accordingly. SN - 2042-7670 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31601733/History,_clinical_findings_and_outcome_of_horses_with_radiographical_signs_of_equine_odontoclastic_tooth_resorption_and_hypercementosis L2 - http://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=31601733 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -