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Selective sexual differentiation of neuron populations may contribute to sex-specific outputs of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus.

Abstract

Sex differences among neurons in the ventrolateral region of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMHvl) allow for the display of a diversity of sex-typical behaviors and physiological responses, ranging from mating behavior to metabolism. Here we review recent studies that interrogate the relationship between sex-typical responses and changes in cellular phenotypes. We discuss technologies that increase the resolution of molecular profiling or targeting of cell populations, including single cell transcriptional profiling and conditional viral genetic approaches to manipulate neuron survival or activity. Overall, emerging studies indicate that sex-typical functions of the VMH may be mediated by phenotypically distinct and sexually differentiated neuron populations within the VMHvl. Future studies in this and other brain regions could exploit cell-type-specific tools to reveal the cell populations and molecular mediators that modulate sex-typical responses. Further, cell-type-specific analyses of the effects of sexually differentiating factors, including sex hormones, can test the hypothesis that distinct cell types within a single brain region vary with respect to sexual differentiation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology of the Brain Research Institute, and Molecular, Cellular, and Integrative Physiology Graduate Program, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology of the Brain Research Institute, and Molecular, Cellular, and Integrative Physiology Graduate Program, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31605642

Citation

Kammel, Laura G., and Stephanie M. Correa. "Selective Sexual Differentiation of Neuron Populations May Contribute to Sex-specific Outputs of the Ventromedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus." Journal of Neuroendocrinology, 2019.
Kammel LG, Correa SM. Selective sexual differentiation of neuron populations may contribute to sex-specific outputs of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. J Neuroendocrinol. 2019.
Kammel, L. G., & Correa, S. M. (2019). Selective sexual differentiation of neuron populations may contribute to sex-specific outputs of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. Journal of Neuroendocrinology, doi:10.1111/jne.12801.
Kammel LG, Correa SM. Selective Sexual Differentiation of Neuron Populations May Contribute to Sex-specific Outputs of the Ventromedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus. J Neuroendocrinol. 2019 Oct 12; PubMed PMID: 31605642.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Selective sexual differentiation of neuron populations may contribute to sex-specific outputs of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. AU - Kammel,Laura G, AU - Correa,Stephanie M, Y1 - 2019/10/12/ PY - 2019/10/13/entrez PY - 2019/10/13/pubmed PY - 2019/10/13/medline JF - Journal of neuroendocrinology JO - J. Neuroendocrinol. N2 - Sex differences among neurons in the ventrolateral region of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMHvl) allow for the display of a diversity of sex-typical behaviors and physiological responses, ranging from mating behavior to metabolism. Here we review recent studies that interrogate the relationship between sex-typical responses and changes in cellular phenotypes. We discuss technologies that increase the resolution of molecular profiling or targeting of cell populations, including single cell transcriptional profiling and conditional viral genetic approaches to manipulate neuron survival or activity. Overall, emerging studies indicate that sex-typical functions of the VMH may be mediated by phenotypically distinct and sexually differentiated neuron populations within the VMHvl. Future studies in this and other brain regions could exploit cell-type-specific tools to reveal the cell populations and molecular mediators that modulate sex-typical responses. Further, cell-type-specific analyses of the effects of sexually differentiating factors, including sex hormones, can test the hypothesis that distinct cell types within a single brain region vary with respect to sexual differentiation. SN - 1365-2826 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31605642/Selective_sexual_differentiation_of_neuron_populations_may_contribute_to_sex-specific_outputs_of_the_ventromedial_nucleus_of_the_hypothalamus L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jne.12801 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -