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Defining Thermally Safe Laser Lithotripsy Power and Irrigation Parameters: In Vitro Model.
J Endourol. 2020 01; 34(1):76-81.JE

Abstract

Introduction: High-power laser settings are commonly employed for stone dusting techniques. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that a toxic thermal dose can result from treatment within a renal calix without adequate irrigation. Hence, both laser power and irrigation rate must be considered together to determine safe laser lithotripsy parameters. The objective of this in vitro study was to map parameter safety boundaries and create guidelines for selection of safe laser and irrigation settings.

Methods:

The experimental system consisted of in vitro models simulating ureter, renal calix, and renal pelvis placed in a water bath maintained at 37°C. Temperature was recorded during ureteroscopy with laser activation for 60 seconds. Trials were conducted at strategically selected power levels and irrigation rates. Thermal dose for each trial was calculated based on Sapareto and Dewey t43 methodology with thermal dose >120 equivalent minutes considered to result in thermal tissue injury. A parameter safety boundary was established by plotting the maximal safe power level for each irrigation rate.

Results:

The parameter safety boundary was found to be linear for each scenario with the renal pelvis able to tolerate the highest laser power and the renal calix the least power without injury.

Conclusion:

This study describes the methodology to determine parameter safety boundaries that can be used to guide proper selection of thermally safe laser settings and irrigation rates during ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy. This work provides a framework to assess the effectiveness of various strategies to control and mitigate thermal dose.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Endourology, Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.Division of Endourology, Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.Division of Endourology, Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.Department of Urology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington.Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.Division of Endourology, Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31608654

Citation

Aldoukhi, Ali H., et al. "Defining Thermally Safe Laser Lithotripsy Power and Irrigation Parameters: in Vitro Model." Journal of Endourology, vol. 34, no. 1, 2020, pp. 76-81.
Aldoukhi AH, Black KM, Hall TL, et al. Defining Thermally Safe Laser Lithotripsy Power and Irrigation Parameters: In Vitro Model. J Endourol. 2020;34(1):76-81.
Aldoukhi, A. H., Black, K. M., Hall, T. L., Ghani, K. R., Maxwell, A. D., MacConaghy, B., & Roberts, W. W. (2020). Defining Thermally Safe Laser Lithotripsy Power and Irrigation Parameters: In Vitro Model. Journal of Endourology, 34(1), 76-81. https://doi.org/10.1089/end.2019.0499
Aldoukhi AH, et al. Defining Thermally Safe Laser Lithotripsy Power and Irrigation Parameters: in Vitro Model. J Endourol. 2020;34(1):76-81. PubMed PMID: 31608654.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Defining Thermally Safe Laser Lithotripsy Power and Irrigation Parameters: In Vitro Model. AU - Aldoukhi,Ali H, AU - Black,Kristian M, AU - Hall,Timothy L, AU - Ghani,Khurshid R, AU - Maxwell,Adam D, AU - MacConaghy,Brian, AU - Roberts,William W, Y1 - 2019/11/19/ PY - 2019/10/15/pubmed PY - 2019/10/15/medline PY - 2019/10/15/entrez KW - holmium laser KW - laser lithotripsy KW - temperature KW - ureteroscopy SP - 76 EP - 81 JF - Journal of endourology JO - J. Endourol. VL - 34 IS - 1 N2 - Introduction: High-power laser settings are commonly employed for stone dusting techniques. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that a toxic thermal dose can result from treatment within a renal calix without adequate irrigation. Hence, both laser power and irrigation rate must be considered together to determine safe laser lithotripsy parameters. The objective of this in vitro study was to map parameter safety boundaries and create guidelines for selection of safe laser and irrigation settings. Methods: The experimental system consisted of in vitro models simulating ureter, renal calix, and renal pelvis placed in a water bath maintained at 37°C. Temperature was recorded during ureteroscopy with laser activation for 60 seconds. Trials were conducted at strategically selected power levels and irrigation rates. Thermal dose for each trial was calculated based on Sapareto and Dewey t43 methodology with thermal dose >120 equivalent minutes considered to result in thermal tissue injury. A parameter safety boundary was established by plotting the maximal safe power level for each irrigation rate. Results: The parameter safety boundary was found to be linear for each scenario with the renal pelvis able to tolerate the highest laser power and the renal calix the least power without injury. Conclusion: This study describes the methodology to determine parameter safety boundaries that can be used to guide proper selection of thermally safe laser settings and irrigation rates during ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy. This work provides a framework to assess the effectiveness of various strategies to control and mitigate thermal dose. SN - 1557-900X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31608654/Defining_Thermally_Safe_Laser_Lithotripsy_Power_and_Irrigation_Parameters:_In_Vitro_Model_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/end.2019.0499?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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