Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Routine use of feeding jejunostomy in oesophageal cancer resections: results of a survey in England.

Abstract

Nutrition and post-operative feeding in oesophageal cancer resections for enhanced recovery remain a controversial subject. Feeding jejunostomy tubes (FJT) have been used post-operatively to address the subject but evidence to support its routine use is contentious. There is currently no data on FJT use in England for oesophageal cancer resections. Knowledge regarding current FJT usage, and rationale for its use may provide a snapshot of the trend and current standing on FJT use by resectional units in England. A standardised survey was sent electronically to all oesophageal resectional units in the United Kingdom (UK) between October 2016 and January 2018. In summary, the questionnaire probes into current FJT use, rationale for its usage, consideration of cessation of its use, and rationale of cessation of its use for units not using FJT. The resectional units were identified using the National Oesophago-Gastric Cancer Audit (NOGCA) progress report 2016 and 1 selected resectional unit from Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, respectively. Performance data of those units were collected from the 2017 NOGCA report. Out of 40 units that were eligible, 32 (80.0%) centres responded. The responses show a heterogeneity of FJT use across the resectional centres. Most centres (56.3%) still place FJT routinely with 2 of 18 (11.1%) were considering stopping its routine use. FJT was considered a mandatory adjunct to chemotherapy in 3 (9.4%) centres. FJT was not routinely used in 9 (28.1%) of centres with 5 of 9 (55.6%) reported previous complications and 4 of 9 (44.4%) cited using other forms of nutrition supplementation as factors for discontinuing FJT use. There were 5 (15.6%) centres with divided practice among its consultants. Of those 2 of 5 (40.0%) were considering stopping FJT use, and hence, a total of 4 of 23 (17.4%) of units are now considering stopping routine FJT use. In conclusion, the wider practice of FJT use in the UK remains heterogenous. More research regarding the optimal post-operative feeding regimen needs to be undertaken.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Peninsula Oesophago-Gastric Centre, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK.Peninsula Oesophago-Gastric Centre, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK.Peninsula Oesophago-Gastric Centre, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK.Peninsula Oesophago-Gastric Centre, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK.Peninsula Oesophago-Gastric Centre, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK.Peninsula Oesophago-Gastric Centre, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK.Peninsula Oesophago-Gastric Centre, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, Plymouth, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31608935

Citation

Tham, J C., et al. "Routine Use of Feeding Jejunostomy in Oesophageal Cancer Resections: Results of a Survey in England." Diseases of the Esophagus : Official Journal of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus, 2019.
Tham JC, Dovell G, Berrisford RG, et al. Routine use of feeding jejunostomy in oesophageal cancer resections: results of a survey in England. Dis Esophagus. 2019.
Tham, J. C., Dovell, G., Berrisford, R. G., Humphreys, M. L., Wheatley, T. J., Sanders, G., & Ariyarathenam, A. V. (2019). Routine use of feeding jejunostomy in oesophageal cancer resections: results of a survey in England. Diseases of the Esophagus : Official Journal of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus, doi:10.1093/dote/doz075.
Tham JC, et al. Routine Use of Feeding Jejunostomy in Oesophageal Cancer Resections: Results of a Survey in England. Dis Esophagus. 2019 Oct 11; PubMed PMID: 31608935.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Routine use of feeding jejunostomy in oesophageal cancer resections: results of a survey in England. AU - Tham,J C, AU - Dovell,G, AU - Berrisford,R G, AU - Humphreys,M L, AU - Wheatley,T J, AU - Sanders,G, AU - Ariyarathenam,A V, Y1 - 2019/10/11/ PY - 2019/01/07/received PY - 2019/05/09/revised PY - 2019/07/26/accepted PY - 2019/10/15/entrez KW - jejunostomy KW - oesophageal cancer KW - oesophagectomy JF - Diseases of the esophagus : official journal of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus JO - Dis. Esophagus N2 - Nutrition and post-operative feeding in oesophageal cancer resections for enhanced recovery remain a controversial subject. Feeding jejunostomy tubes (FJT) have been used post-operatively to address the subject but evidence to support its routine use is contentious. There is currently no data on FJT use in England for oesophageal cancer resections. Knowledge regarding current FJT usage, and rationale for its use may provide a snapshot of the trend and current standing on FJT use by resectional units in England. A standardised survey was sent electronically to all oesophageal resectional units in the United Kingdom (UK) between October 2016 and January 2018. In summary, the questionnaire probes into current FJT use, rationale for its usage, consideration of cessation of its use, and rationale of cessation of its use for units not using FJT. The resectional units were identified using the National Oesophago-Gastric Cancer Audit (NOGCA) progress report 2016 and 1 selected resectional unit from Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, respectively. Performance data of those units were collected from the 2017 NOGCA report. Out of 40 units that were eligible, 32 (80.0%) centres responded. The responses show a heterogeneity of FJT use across the resectional centres. Most centres (56.3%) still place FJT routinely with 2 of 18 (11.1%) were considering stopping its routine use. FJT was considered a mandatory adjunct to chemotherapy in 3 (9.4%) centres. FJT was not routinely used in 9 (28.1%) of centres with 5 of 9 (55.6%) reported previous complications and 4 of 9 (44.4%) cited using other forms of nutrition supplementation as factors for discontinuing FJT use. There were 5 (15.6%) centres with divided practice among its consultants. Of those 2 of 5 (40.0%) were considering stopping FJT use, and hence, a total of 4 of 23 (17.4%) of units are now considering stopping routine FJT use. In conclusion, the wider practice of FJT use in the UK remains heterogenous. More research regarding the optimal post-operative feeding regimen needs to be undertaken. SN - 1442-2050 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31608935/Routine_use_of_feeding_jejunostomy_in_oesophageal_cancer_resections:_results_of_a_survey_in_England DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -