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Survival of aging CD264+ and CD264- populations of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells is independent of colony-forming efficiency.

Abstract

In vivo mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) survival is relevant to therapeutic applications requiring engraftment and potentially to nonengraftment applications as well. MSCs are a mixture of progenitors at different stages of cellular aging, but the contribution of this heterogeneity to the survival of MSC implants is unknown. Here, we employ a biomarker of cellular aging, the decoy TRAIL receptor CD264, to compare the survival kinetics of two cell populations in human bone marrow MSC (hBM-MSC) cultures. Sorted CD264+ hBM-MSCs from two age-matched donors have elevated β-galactosidase activity, decreased differentiation potential and form in vitro colonies inefficiently relative to CD264- hBM-MSCs. Counterintuitive to their aging phenotype, CD264+ hBM-MSCs exhibited comparable survival to matched CD264- hBM-MSCs from the same culture during in vitro colony formation and in vivo when implanted ectopically in immunodeficient NIH III mice. In vitro and in vivo survival of these two cell populations were independent of colony-forming efficiency. These findings have ramifications for the preparation of hBM-MSC therapies given the prevalence of aging CD264+ cells in hBM-MSC cultures and the popularity of colony-forming efficiency as a quality control metric in preclinical and clinical studies with MSCs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.Department of Comparative Medicine, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.Department of Comparative Medicine, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. Center for Aging, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. Center for Aging, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. Center for Aging, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31612990

Citation

Madsen, Sean D., et al. "Survival of Aging CD264+ and CD264- Populations of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Is Independent of Colony-forming Efficiency." Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 2019.
Madsen SD, Jones SH, Tucker HA, et al. Survival of aging CD264+ and CD264- populations of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells is independent of colony-forming efficiency. Biotechnol Bioeng. 2019.
Madsen, S. D., Jones, S. H., Tucker, H. A., Giler, M. K., Muller, D. C., Discher, C. T., ... O'Connor, K. C. (2019). Survival of aging CD264+ and CD264- populations of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells is independent of colony-forming efficiency. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, doi:10.1002/bit.27195.
Madsen SD, et al. Survival of Aging CD264+ and CD264- Populations of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Is Independent of Colony-forming Efficiency. Biotechnol Bioeng. 2019 Oct 15; PubMed PMID: 31612990.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Survival of aging CD264+ and CD264- populations of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells is independent of colony-forming efficiency. AU - Madsen,Sean D, AU - Jones,Sean H, AU - Tucker,H Alan, AU - Giler,Margaret K, AU - Muller,Dyllan C, AU - Discher,Carson T, AU - Russell,Katie C, AU - Dobek,Georgina L, AU - Sammarco,Mimi C, AU - Bunnell,Bruce A, AU - O'Connor,Kim C, Y1 - 2019/10/15/ PY - 2019/05/27/received PY - 2019/09/20/revised PY - 2019/10/07/accepted PY - 2019/10/16/pubmed PY - 2019/10/16/medline PY - 2019/10/16/entrez KW - aging KW - decoy TRAIL receptor 2 (CD264) KW - mesenchymal stem cells KW - survival JF - Biotechnology and bioengineering JO - Biotechnol. Bioeng. N2 - In vivo mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) survival is relevant to therapeutic applications requiring engraftment and potentially to nonengraftment applications as well. MSCs are a mixture of progenitors at different stages of cellular aging, but the contribution of this heterogeneity to the survival of MSC implants is unknown. Here, we employ a biomarker of cellular aging, the decoy TRAIL receptor CD264, to compare the survival kinetics of two cell populations in human bone marrow MSC (hBM-MSC) cultures. Sorted CD264+ hBM-MSCs from two age-matched donors have elevated β-galactosidase activity, decreased differentiation potential and form in vitro colonies inefficiently relative to CD264- hBM-MSCs. Counterintuitive to their aging phenotype, CD264+ hBM-MSCs exhibited comparable survival to matched CD264- hBM-MSCs from the same culture during in vitro colony formation and in vivo when implanted ectopically in immunodeficient NIH III mice. In vitro and in vivo survival of these two cell populations were independent of colony-forming efficiency. These findings have ramifications for the preparation of hBM-MSC therapies given the prevalence of aging CD264+ cells in hBM-MSC cultures and the popularity of colony-forming efficiency as a quality control metric in preclinical and clinical studies with MSCs. SN - 1097-0290 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31612990/Survival_of_aging_CD264+_and_CD264-_populations_of_human_bone_marrow_mesenchymal_stem_cells_is_independent_of_colony-forming_efficiency L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/bit.27195 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -