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Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Myosin Exert Procoagulant Effects.
Shock 2019; 52(5):554-555S

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) and the tissue injury-provoked procoagulant profile are prevalent in severely injured patients, but their mechanisms remain unclear. Myosin, exposed by or released from tissue injury, may play a role in promoting thrombin generation and attenuating fibrinolysis. The objective of the study is to examine the effects of cardiac and skeletal muscle myosins on coagulation in whole blood using thrombelastography (TEG).

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Whole blood was collected from healthy adult volunteers (n=8) and native TEGs were performed to evaluate the global coagulation response in the presence of cardiac or skeletal muscle myosin by measuring reaction (R) time (minutes), clot angle (), and maximum amplitude (MA, mm). TEG measurements were compared using paired t tests.

RESULTS

Cardiac and skeletal muscle myosins decreased R, from 10.8 min to 8.0 min (P<0.0001) and 6.9 min (P =0.0007), respectively. There were no effects observed on clot propagation (angle) or clot strength (MA) with myosin addition. In the presence of tPA, both cardiac and skeletal muscle myosins shortened R from 11.1 min to 8.62 min (P=0.0245) and 7.75 min (P =0.0027), respectively), with no changes on angle or MA.

CONCLUSIONS

Cardiac and skeletal muscle myosins exhibit procoagulant effects in TEG assays. These whole blood TEG results support the hypothesis that cardiac and skeletal muscle myosins may be either pro-hemostatic or prothrombotic depending on context.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado.Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. Ernest E Moore Shock Trauma Center at Denver Health, Denver, Colorado.Department of Molecular Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California. Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine and Division of Hematology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon.Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado.Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. Ernest E Moore Shock Trauma Center at Denver Health, Denver, Colorado.Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado. Vitalant Blood Center, Denver, Colorado.Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado.Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado.Department of Molecular Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California.Department of Molecular Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31613865

Citation

Coleman, Julia R., et al. "Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Myosin Exert Procoagulant Effects." Shock (Augusta, Ga.), vol. 52, no. 5, 2019, pp. 554-555.
Coleman JR, Moore EE, Zilberman-Rudenko J, et al. Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Myosin Exert Procoagulant Effects. Shock. 2019;52(5):554-555.
Coleman, J. R., Moore, E. E., Zilberman-Rudenko, J., Samuels, J. M., Cohen, M. J., Silliman, C. C., ... Deguchi, H. (2019). Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Myosin Exert Procoagulant Effects. Shock (Augusta, Ga.), 52(5), pp. 554-555. doi:10.1097/SHK.0000000000001426.
Coleman JR, et al. Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Myosin Exert Procoagulant Effects. Shock. 2019;52(5):554-555. PubMed PMID: 31613865.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Myosin Exert Procoagulant Effects. AU - Coleman,Julia R, AU - Moore,Ernest E, AU - Zilberman-Rudenko,Jevgenia, AU - Samuels,Jason M, AU - Cohen,Mitchell J, AU - Silliman,Christopher C, AU - Banerjee,Anirban, AU - Sauaia,Angela, AU - Griffin,John H, AU - Deguchi,Hiroshi, PY - 2019/10/16/entrez PY - 2019/10/16/pubmed PY - 2019/10/16/medline SP - 554 EP - 555 JF - Shock (Augusta, Ga.) JO - Shock VL - 52 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) and the tissue injury-provoked procoagulant profile are prevalent in severely injured patients, but their mechanisms remain unclear. Myosin, exposed by or released from tissue injury, may play a role in promoting thrombin generation and attenuating fibrinolysis. The objective of the study is to examine the effects of cardiac and skeletal muscle myosins on coagulation in whole blood using thrombelastography (TEG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Whole blood was collected from healthy adult volunteers (n=8) and native TEGs were performed to evaluate the global coagulation response in the presence of cardiac or skeletal muscle myosin by measuring reaction (R) time (minutes), clot angle (), and maximum amplitude (MA, mm). TEG measurements were compared using paired t tests. RESULTS: Cardiac and skeletal muscle myosins decreased R, from 10.8 min to 8.0 min (P<0.0001) and 6.9 min (P =0.0007), respectively. There were no effects observed on clot propagation (angle) or clot strength (MA) with myosin addition. In the presence of tPA, both cardiac and skeletal muscle myosins shortened R from 11.1 min to 8.62 min (P=0.0245) and 7.75 min (P =0.0027), respectively), with no changes on angle or MA. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiac and skeletal muscle myosins exhibit procoagulant effects in TEG assays. These whole blood TEG results support the hypothesis that cardiac and skeletal muscle myosins may be either pro-hemostatic or prothrombotic depending on context. SN - 1540-0514 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31613865/Cardiac_and_Skeletal_Muscle_Myosin_Exert_Procoagulant_Effects L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SHK.0000000000001426 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -