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Post-natal Growth Retardation Associated With Impaired Gut Hormone Profiles, Immune and Antioxidant Function in Pigs.

Abstract

The factors that cause post-natal growth retardation (PGR) in pigs are complicated; however, metabolic and immune system impairment seem to be involved. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes of blood parameters, hormone profiles, antioxidant capacity, and immune responses in PGR pigs. Blood and small intestinal mucosa samples were collected from 42-days-old PGR and healthy pigs. The results showed that compared with the healthy group, the relative weight of spleen and kidney were greater, but the liver was lighter in PGR pigs (P < 0.05). The PGR pigs had increased serum alanine transaminase, urea nitrogen, blood ammonia, IgG, and complement 4, but decreased glucose and albumin (P < 0.05). The higher levels of serum leptin (LEP) and thyroxin (T4), and the lower levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), somatostatin (SS), and agouti gene-related protein (AgRP) were observed in PGR pigs (P < 0.05). Consistent with the serum levels of hormones, the mRNA levels of gut hormones and their receptors were also altered in intestinal mucosa from PGR pigs (P < 0.05). The PGR pigs exhibited higher plasma concentrations of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, and transformed growth factor beta (TGFβ) (P < 0.05). However, the mRNA expressions of several cytokines were lower in the small intestinal mucosa of PGR pigs (P < 0.05). Abnormal antioxidant indexes in serum of PGR pigs were observed, which was in accordance with the reduced mRNA expression of several anti-oxidative genes in the small intestinal mucosa of PGR pigs (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that an abnormal gut hormone system, immune dysfunction, and decreased antioxidant capacity may contribute to PGR in pigs. These changes could provide a valuable target in the regulation of post-natal growth retardation in animals and humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Animal Nutritional Physiology and Metabolic Process, Key Laboratory of Agro-Ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, National Engineering Laboratory for Pollution Control and Waste Utilization in Livestock and Poultry Production, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha, China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.Laboratory of Animal Nutritional Physiology and Metabolic Process, Key Laboratory of Agro-Ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, National Engineering Laboratory for Pollution Control and Waste Utilization in Livestock and Poultry Production, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha, China. College of Animal Science and Technology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, China.Laboratory of Animal Nutritional Physiology and Metabolic Process, Key Laboratory of Agro-Ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, National Engineering Laboratory for Pollution Control and Waste Utilization in Livestock and Poultry Production, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha, China.Laboratory of Animal Nutritional Physiology and Metabolic Process, Key Laboratory of Agro-Ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, National Engineering Laboratory for Pollution Control and Waste Utilization in Livestock and Poultry Production, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha, China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.Laboratory of Animal Nutritional Physiology and Metabolic Process, Key Laboratory of Agro-Ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, National Engineering Laboratory for Pollution Control and Waste Utilization in Livestock and Poultry Production, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha, China.Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, United States.Laboratory of Animal Nutritional Physiology and Metabolic Process, Key Laboratory of Agro-Ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, National Engineering Laboratory for Pollution Control and Waste Utilization in Livestock and Poultry Production, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31616382

Citation

Qi, Ming, et al. "Post-natal Growth Retardation Associated With Impaired Gut Hormone Profiles, Immune and Antioxidant Function in Pigs." Frontiers in Endocrinology, vol. 10, 2019, p. 660.
Qi M, Tan B, Wang J, et al. Post-natal Growth Retardation Associated With Impaired Gut Hormone Profiles, Immune and Antioxidant Function in Pigs. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2019;10:660.
Qi, M., Tan, B., Wang, J., Liao, S., Li, J., Liu, Y., & Yin, Y. (2019). Post-natal Growth Retardation Associated With Impaired Gut Hormone Profiles, Immune and Antioxidant Function in Pigs. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 10, p. 660. doi:10.3389/fendo.2019.00660.
Qi M, et al. Post-natal Growth Retardation Associated With Impaired Gut Hormone Profiles, Immune and Antioxidant Function in Pigs. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2019;10:660. PubMed PMID: 31616382.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Post-natal Growth Retardation Associated With Impaired Gut Hormone Profiles, Immune and Antioxidant Function in Pigs. AU - Qi,Ming, AU - Tan,Bie, AU - Wang,Jing, AU - Liao,Simeng, AU - Li,Jianjun, AU - Liu,Yanhong, AU - Yin,Yulong, Y1 - 2019/09/26/ PY - 2019/07/02/received PY - 2019/09/11/accepted PY - 2019/10/17/entrez PY - 2019/10/17/pubmed PY - 2019/10/17/medline KW - antioxidant capacity KW - appetite KW - blood parameters KW - hormone secretion KW - immune response KW - post-natal growth retardation SP - 660 EP - 660 JF - Frontiers in endocrinology JO - Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) VL - 10 N2 - The factors that cause post-natal growth retardation (PGR) in pigs are complicated; however, metabolic and immune system impairment seem to be involved. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes of blood parameters, hormone profiles, antioxidant capacity, and immune responses in PGR pigs. Blood and small intestinal mucosa samples were collected from 42-days-old PGR and healthy pigs. The results showed that compared with the healthy group, the relative weight of spleen and kidney were greater, but the liver was lighter in PGR pigs (P < 0.05). The PGR pigs had increased serum alanine transaminase, urea nitrogen, blood ammonia, IgG, and complement 4, but decreased glucose and albumin (P < 0.05). The higher levels of serum leptin (LEP) and thyroxin (T4), and the lower levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), somatostatin (SS), and agouti gene-related protein (AgRP) were observed in PGR pigs (P < 0.05). Consistent with the serum levels of hormones, the mRNA levels of gut hormones and their receptors were also altered in intestinal mucosa from PGR pigs (P < 0.05). The PGR pigs exhibited higher plasma concentrations of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, and transformed growth factor beta (TGFβ) (P < 0.05). However, the mRNA expressions of several cytokines were lower in the small intestinal mucosa of PGR pigs (P < 0.05). Abnormal antioxidant indexes in serum of PGR pigs were observed, which was in accordance with the reduced mRNA expression of several anti-oxidative genes in the small intestinal mucosa of PGR pigs (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that an abnormal gut hormone system, immune dysfunction, and decreased antioxidant capacity may contribute to PGR in pigs. These changes could provide a valuable target in the regulation of post-natal growth retardation in animals and humans. SN - 1664-2392 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31616382/Post-natal_Growth_Retardation_Associated_With_Impaired_Gut_Hormone_Profiles,_Immune_and_Antioxidant_Function_in_Pigs L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2019.00660 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -