Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

An exploratory study of vibration therapy on muscle function in patients with peripheral artery disease.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine whether a single session of vibration therapy (VT) would improve muscular and functional performance in individuals with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD).

METHODS

In a randomized, balanced cross-over design fourteen PAD participants with intermittent claudication (mean ± standard deviation; age, 73.9 ± 4.6 years; height, 172.6 ± 68.4 cm; body mass, 85.2 ± 15.7 kg) performed VT and control that involved repeated chair rises, timed up-and-go test, and 6-minute walk test. Each intervention was separated by at least 2 days. Wearable VT devices were positioned on the right and left lower limbs that were turned on during functional testing but were turned off for the control intervention.

RESULTS

VT significantly improved (P < .05) repeated chair rises and timed up-and-go test compared with control with a small effect size of 0.46 and 0.45, respectively. Similarly, a significant (P < .01) and meaningful change in 6-minute walk test was noted in VT compared with control.

CONCLUSIONS

This exploratory study suggest that VT may enhance functional strength, mobility, and walking performance by extending the onset of claudication and increasing walking distance in PAD with intermittent claudication. However, further study is required to confirm and extend these preliminary findings and determine the potential mechanisms of action in VT.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Sport, Exercise and Nutrition, Massey University, New Zealand. Electronic address: d.cochrane@massey.ac.nz.Department of Vascular, Endovascular and Transplant Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand.Department of Vascular, Endovascular and Transplant Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand; Department of Surgery, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31619350

Citation

Cochrane, Darryl J., et al. "An Exploratory Study of Vibration Therapy On Muscle Function in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease." Journal of Vascular Surgery, 2019.
Cochrane DJ, Cochrane F, Roake JA. An exploratory study of vibration therapy on muscle function in patients with peripheral artery disease. J Vasc Surg. 2019.
Cochrane, D. J., Cochrane, F., & Roake, J. A. (2019). An exploratory study of vibration therapy on muscle function in patients with peripheral artery disease. Journal of Vascular Surgery, doi:10.1016/j.jvs.2019.06.214.
Cochrane DJ, Cochrane F, Roake JA. An Exploratory Study of Vibration Therapy On Muscle Function in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease. J Vasc Surg. 2019 Oct 13; PubMed PMID: 31619350.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An exploratory study of vibration therapy on muscle function in patients with peripheral artery disease. AU - Cochrane,Darryl J, AU - Cochrane,Fiona, AU - Roake,Justin A, Y1 - 2019/10/13/ PY - 2019/02/20/received PY - 2019/06/24/accepted PY - 2019/10/18/entrez KW - 6-minute walk KW - Intermittent claudication KW - Mobility KW - Stand-to-sit KW - Timed get-up-and-go KW - Vibration therapy JF - Journal of vascular surgery JO - J. Vasc. Surg. N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine whether a single session of vibration therapy (VT) would improve muscular and functional performance in individuals with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD). METHODS: In a randomized, balanced cross-over design fourteen PAD participants with intermittent claudication (mean ± standard deviation; age, 73.9 ± 4.6 years; height, 172.6 ± 68.4 cm; body mass, 85.2 ± 15.7 kg) performed VT and control that involved repeated chair rises, timed up-and-go test, and 6-minute walk test. Each intervention was separated by at least 2 days. Wearable VT devices were positioned on the right and left lower limbs that were turned on during functional testing but were turned off for the control intervention. RESULTS: VT significantly improved (P < .05) repeated chair rises and timed up-and-go test compared with control with a small effect size of 0.46 and 0.45, respectively. Similarly, a significant (P < .01) and meaningful change in 6-minute walk test was noted in VT compared with control. CONCLUSIONS: This exploratory study suggest that VT may enhance functional strength, mobility, and walking performance by extending the onset of claudication and increasing walking distance in PAD with intermittent claudication. However, further study is required to confirm and extend these preliminary findings and determine the potential mechanisms of action in VT. SN - 1097-6809 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31619350/An_exploratory_study_of_vibration_therapy_on_muscle_function_in_patients_with_peripheral_artery_disease L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0741-5214(19)31935-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -