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Association of Long-Term Dynamics in Circulating Testosterone with Serum PSA in Prostate Cancer-Free Men with Initial-PSA < 4 ng/mL.
Horm Cancer. 2019 12; 10(4-6):168-176.HC

Abstract

We previously reported that an accelerated decline in circulating testosterone level is associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer (PCa). This study is to examine whether testosterone change rate is related to serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration among PCa-free men. Longitudinal data were derived from electronic medical records at a tertiary hospital in the Southeastern USA. PCa-free men with initial-PSA < 4 ng/mL and ≥ 2 testosterone measurements were included (n = 632). Three PSA measures (peak, the most recent, and average PSA) during the study period (from first testosterone measurement to the most recent hospital visit) were examined using multivariable-adjusted geometric means and were compared across quintiles of testosterone change rate (ng/dL/month) and current testosterone level (cross-sectional). Mean (standard deviation, SD) age at baseline was 59.3 (10.5) years; mean study period was 93.0 (55.3) months. After adjusting for covariates including baseline testosterone, the three PSA measures all significantly increased across quintile of testosterone change rate from increase to decline (peak PSA: quint 1 = 1.09, quint 5 = 1.41; the most recent PSA: quint 1 = 0.85, quint 5 = 1.00; average PSA: quint 1 = 0.89, quint 5 = 1.02; all Ptrend < 0.001). But current testosterone level was not associated with PSA levels. Stratified analyses indicated men with higher adiposity (body mass index > 24.1 kg/m2) or lower baseline testosterone (≤ 296 ng/dL) were more sensitive to testosterone change in regard to PSA. Among PCa-free men, accelerated testosterone decline might correlate with higher serum PSA concentration. It will help to elucidate the mechanisms relating aging-accompanying testosterone dynamics to prostate carcinogenesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. nhkwa@channing.harvard.edu. Department of Epidemiology and Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. nhkwa@channing.harvard.edu.Department of Epidemiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.Department of Epidemiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.Department of Biostatistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.Department of Urology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. National Medical Association and Research Group, Gainesville, FL, USA.Department of Epidemiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31621000

Citation

Wang, Kai, et al. "Association of Long-Term Dynamics in Circulating Testosterone With Serum PSA in Prostate Cancer-Free Men With Initial-PSA < 4 Ng/mL." Hormones & Cancer, vol. 10, no. 4-6, 2019, pp. 168-176.
Wang K, Chen X, Cheng TD, et al. Association of Long-Term Dynamics in Circulating Testosterone with Serum PSA in Prostate Cancer-Free Men with Initial-PSA < 4 ng/mL. Horm Cancer. 2019;10(4-6):168-176.
Wang, K., Chen, X., Cheng, T. D., Qiu, P., Bird, V. Y., & Prosperi, M. (2019). Association of Long-Term Dynamics in Circulating Testosterone with Serum PSA in Prostate Cancer-Free Men with Initial-PSA < 4 ng/mL. Hormones & Cancer, 10(4-6), 168-176. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12672-019-00369-y
Wang K, et al. Association of Long-Term Dynamics in Circulating Testosterone With Serum PSA in Prostate Cancer-Free Men With Initial-PSA < 4 Ng/mL. Horm Cancer. 2019;10(4-6):168-176. PubMed PMID: 31621000.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of Long-Term Dynamics in Circulating Testosterone with Serum PSA in Prostate Cancer-Free Men with Initial-PSA < 4 ng/mL. AU - Wang,Kai, AU - Chen,Xinguang, AU - Cheng,Ting-Yuan David, AU - Qiu,Peihua, AU - Bird,Victoria Y, AU - Prosperi,Mattia, Y1 - 2019/10/16/ PY - 2019/08/27/received PY - 2019/09/30/accepted PY - 2019/10/18/pubmed PY - 2019/10/18/medline PY - 2019/10/18/entrez KW - Aging KW - Dynamics KW - Prostate cancer KW - Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) KW - Testosterone SP - 168 EP - 176 JF - Hormones & cancer JO - Horm Cancer VL - 10 IS - 4-6 N2 - We previously reported that an accelerated decline in circulating testosterone level is associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer (PCa). This study is to examine whether testosterone change rate is related to serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration among PCa-free men. Longitudinal data were derived from electronic medical records at a tertiary hospital in the Southeastern USA. PCa-free men with initial-PSA < 4 ng/mL and ≥ 2 testosterone measurements were included (n = 632). Three PSA measures (peak, the most recent, and average PSA) during the study period (from first testosterone measurement to the most recent hospital visit) were examined using multivariable-adjusted geometric means and were compared across quintiles of testosterone change rate (ng/dL/month) and current testosterone level (cross-sectional). Mean (standard deviation, SD) age at baseline was 59.3 (10.5) years; mean study period was 93.0 (55.3) months. After adjusting for covariates including baseline testosterone, the three PSA measures all significantly increased across quintile of testosterone change rate from increase to decline (peak PSA: quint 1 = 1.09, quint 5 = 1.41; the most recent PSA: quint 1 = 0.85, quint 5 = 1.00; average PSA: quint 1 = 0.89, quint 5 = 1.02; all Ptrend < 0.001). But current testosterone level was not associated with PSA levels. Stratified analyses indicated men with higher adiposity (body mass index > 24.1 kg/m2) or lower baseline testosterone (≤ 296 ng/dL) were more sensitive to testosterone change in regard to PSA. Among PCa-free men, accelerated testosterone decline might correlate with higher serum PSA concentration. It will help to elucidate the mechanisms relating aging-accompanying testosterone dynamics to prostate carcinogenesis. SN - 1868-8500 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31621000/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12672-019-00369-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -