Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Viral respiratory infections and the oropharyngeal bacterial microbiota in acutely wheezing children.
PLoS One 2019; 14(10):e0223990Plos

Abstract

Acute viral wheeze in children is a major cause of hospitalisation and a major risk factor for the development of asthma. However, the role of the respiratory tract microbiome in the development of acute wheeze is unclear. To investigate whether severe wheezing episodes in children are associated with bacterial dysbiosis in the respiratory tract, oropharyngeal swabs were collected from 109 children with acute wheezing attending the only tertiary paediatric hospital in Perth, Australia. The bacterial community from these samples was explored using next generation sequencing and compared to samples from 75 non-wheezing controls. No significant difference in bacterial diversity was observed between samples from those with wheeze and healthy controls. Within the wheezing group, attendance at kindergarten or preschool was however, associated with increased bacterial diversity. Rhinovirus (RV) infection did not have a significant effect on bacterial community composition. A significant difference in bacterial richness was observed between children with RV-A and RV-C infection, however this is likely due to the differences in age group between the patient cohorts. The bacterial community within the oropharynx was found to be diverse and heterogeneous. Age and attendance at day care or kindergarten were important factors in driving bacterial diversity. However, wheeze and viral infection were not found to significantly relate to the bacterial community. Bacterial airway microbiome is highly variable in early life and its role in wheeze remains less clear than viral influences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, England, United Kingdom.Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Respiratory Department, Perth Children's Hospital, Perth, Western Australia.National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, England, United Kingdom.Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia.Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.Department of Microbiology, PathWest Laboratory Medicine WA, QEII Medical Centre, Perth, Australia.Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia.Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia.Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Emergency Department, Perth Children's Hospital, Perth, Australia. Division of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Department of Microbiology, PathWest Laboratory Medicine WA, QEII Medical Centre, Perth, Australia. Medical School, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia.Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia.Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Australia.National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, England, United Kingdom.National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, England, United Kingdom. Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, London, England, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31622414

Citation

Cuthbertson, Leah, et al. "Viral Respiratory Infections and the Oropharyngeal Bacterial Microbiota in Acutely Wheezing Children." PloS One, vol. 14, no. 10, 2019, pp. e0223990.
Cuthbertson L, Oo SWC, Cox MJ, et al. Viral respiratory infections and the oropharyngeal bacterial microbiota in acutely wheezing children. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(10):e0223990.
Cuthbertson, L., Oo, S. W. C., Cox, M. J., Khoo, S. K., Cox, D. W., Chidlow, G., ... Cookson, W. O. C. (2019). Viral respiratory infections and the oropharyngeal bacterial microbiota in acutely wheezing children. PloS One, 14(10), pp. e0223990. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0223990.
Cuthbertson L, et al. Viral Respiratory Infections and the Oropharyngeal Bacterial Microbiota in Acutely Wheezing Children. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(10):e0223990. PubMed PMID: 31622414.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Viral respiratory infections and the oropharyngeal bacterial microbiota in acutely wheezing children. AU - Cuthbertson,Leah, AU - Oo,Stephen W C, AU - Cox,Michael J, AU - Khoo,Siew-Kim, AU - Cox,Des W, AU - Chidlow,Glenys, AU - Franks,Kimberley, AU - Prastanti,Franciska, AU - Borland,Meredith L, AU - Gern,James E, AU - Smith,David W, AU - Bizzintino,Joelene A, AU - Laing,Ingrid A, AU - Le Souëf,Peter N, AU - Moffatt,Miriam F, AU - Cookson,William O C, Y1 - 2019/10/17/ PY - 2019/07/17/received PY - 2019/10/02/accepted PY - 2019/10/18/entrez PY - 2019/10/18/pubmed PY - 2019/10/18/medline SP - e0223990 EP - e0223990 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 14 IS - 10 N2 - Acute viral wheeze in children is a major cause of hospitalisation and a major risk factor for the development of asthma. However, the role of the respiratory tract microbiome in the development of acute wheeze is unclear. To investigate whether severe wheezing episodes in children are associated with bacterial dysbiosis in the respiratory tract, oropharyngeal swabs were collected from 109 children with acute wheezing attending the only tertiary paediatric hospital in Perth, Australia. The bacterial community from these samples was explored using next generation sequencing and compared to samples from 75 non-wheezing controls. No significant difference in bacterial diversity was observed between samples from those with wheeze and healthy controls. Within the wheezing group, attendance at kindergarten or preschool was however, associated with increased bacterial diversity. Rhinovirus (RV) infection did not have a significant effect on bacterial community composition. A significant difference in bacterial richness was observed between children with RV-A and RV-C infection, however this is likely due to the differences in age group between the patient cohorts. The bacterial community within the oropharynx was found to be diverse and heterogeneous. Age and attendance at day care or kindergarten were important factors in driving bacterial diversity. However, wheeze and viral infection were not found to significantly relate to the bacterial community. Bacterial airway microbiome is highly variable in early life and its role in wheeze remains less clear than viral influences. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31622414/Viral_respiratory_infections_and_the_oropharyngeal_bacterial_microbiota_in_acutely_wheezing_children L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0223990 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -