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Telomere length in COPD: Relationships with physical activity, exercise capacity, and acute exacerbations.
PLoS One 2019; 14(10):e0223891Plos

Abstract

RATIONALE

Shorter leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with reduced health-related quality of life and increased risk for acute exacerbations (AEs) and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Increased physical activity and exercise capacity are associated with reduced risk for AEs and death. However, the relationships between LTL and physical activity, exercise capacity, and AEs in COPD are unknown.

METHODS

Data from 3 COPD cohorts were examined: Cohort 1 (n = 112, physical activity intervention trial), Cohorts 2 and 3 (n = 182 and 294, respectively, separate observational studies). Subjects completed a 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and provided blood for LTL assessment using real-time PCR. Physical activity was measured as average daily step count using an accelerometer or pedometer. Number of self-reported AEs was available for 1) the year prior to enrollment (Cohorts 1 and 3) and 2) prospectively after enrollment (all cohorts). Multivariate models examined associations between LTL and average daily step count, 6MWT distance, and AEs.

RESULTS

A significant association between longer LTL and increased 6MWT distance was observed in the three combined cohorts (β = 3x10-5, p = 0.045). No association between LTL and average daily step count was observed. Shorter LTL was associated with an increased number of AEs in the year prior to enrollment (Cohorts 1 and 3 combined, β = -1.93, p = 0.04) and with prospective AEs (Cohort 3, β = -1.3388, p = 0.0003).

CONCLUSIONS

Among COPD patients, increased LTL is associated with higher exercise capacity, but not physical activity. Shorter LTL was associated with AEs in a subgroup of cohorts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, United States of America. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America.VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, United States of America.VA Puget Sound, Seattle, WA, United States of America. University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States of America.Department of Research & Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Pasadena, CA, United States of America.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America. Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America.VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, United States of America. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America.Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America. Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America. Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America.VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, United States of America. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31622416

Citation

Wan, Emily S., et al. "Telomere Length in COPD: Relationships With Physical Activity, Exercise Capacity, and Acute Exacerbations." PloS One, vol. 14, no. 10, 2019, pp. e0223891.
Wan ES, Goldstein RL, Fan VS, et al. Telomere length in COPD: Relationships with physical activity, exercise capacity, and acute exacerbations. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(10):e0223891.
Wan, E. S., Goldstein, R. L., Fan, V. S., Nguyen, H. Q., Hart, J. E., Garshick, E., ... Moy, M. L. (2019). Telomere length in COPD: Relationships with physical activity, exercise capacity, and acute exacerbations. PloS One, 14(10), pp. e0223891. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0223891.
Wan ES, et al. Telomere Length in COPD: Relationships With Physical Activity, Exercise Capacity, and Acute Exacerbations. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(10):e0223891. PubMed PMID: 31622416.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Telomere length in COPD: Relationships with physical activity, exercise capacity, and acute exacerbations. AU - Wan,Emily S, AU - Goldstein,Rebekah L, AU - Fan,Vincent S, AU - Nguyen,Huong Q, AU - Hart,Jaime E, AU - Garshick,Eric, AU - Orr,Esther H, AU - DeVivo,Immaculata, AU - Moy,Marilyn L, Y1 - 2019/10/17/ PY - 2019/05/18/received PY - 2019/09/10/accepted PY - 2019/10/18/entrez PY - 2019/10/18/pubmed PY - 2019/10/18/medline SP - e0223891 EP - e0223891 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 14 IS - 10 N2 - RATIONALE: Shorter leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with reduced health-related quality of life and increased risk for acute exacerbations (AEs) and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Increased physical activity and exercise capacity are associated with reduced risk for AEs and death. However, the relationships between LTL and physical activity, exercise capacity, and AEs in COPD are unknown. METHODS: Data from 3 COPD cohorts were examined: Cohort 1 (n = 112, physical activity intervention trial), Cohorts 2 and 3 (n = 182 and 294, respectively, separate observational studies). Subjects completed a 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and provided blood for LTL assessment using real-time PCR. Physical activity was measured as average daily step count using an accelerometer or pedometer. Number of self-reported AEs was available for 1) the year prior to enrollment (Cohorts 1 and 3) and 2) prospectively after enrollment (all cohorts). Multivariate models examined associations between LTL and average daily step count, 6MWT distance, and AEs. RESULTS: A significant association between longer LTL and increased 6MWT distance was observed in the three combined cohorts (β = 3x10-5, p = 0.045). No association between LTL and average daily step count was observed. Shorter LTL was associated with an increased number of AEs in the year prior to enrollment (Cohorts 1 and 3 combined, β = -1.93, p = 0.04) and with prospective AEs (Cohort 3, β = -1.3388, p = 0.0003). CONCLUSIONS: Among COPD patients, increased LTL is associated with higher exercise capacity, but not physical activity. Shorter LTL was associated with AEs in a subgroup of cohorts. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31622416/Telomere_length_in_COPD:_Relationships_with_physical_activity,_exercise_capacity,_and_acute_exacerbations L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0223891 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -