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Antibiotic prescriptions in Italian hospitalised children after serial point prevalence surveys (or pointless prevalence surveys): has anything actually changed over the years?
Ital J Pediatr 2019; 45(1):127IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Point prevalence surveys have been used in several studies to provide immediate and easily comparable information about antibiotic use and showed that about one third of hospitalised children had on ongoing antimicrobial prescription during their hospital admission. The aim of this study, as part of the Global Antimicrobial Resistance, Prescribing and Efficacy in Neonates and Children project, is to describe antimicrobial prescriptions among hospitalised children in four tertiary care hospitals in Italy to show if something has changed over the years.

METHODS

Four tertiary care Italian's hospitals joined three Point Prevalence Surveys (PPSs) in three different period of the year. All children under 18 years of age with an ongoing antimicrobial prescription, admitted on the participating wards at 8 o'clock in the morning of the selecting day were enrolled.

RESULTS

A total of 1412 patients (475 neonates and 937 children) were admitted in the days of three PPSs. Overall, among the total admitted patients, 565 patients (40%) had an ongoing antimicrobial prescription in the days of the survey A total of 718 antibiotics were administered in the 485 admitted children and 133 in neonates. The most common indications for antibiotic therapy in children was Lower respiratory tract infections (244/718, 34%), while in neonates were prophylaxis for medical problems (35/133, 26.3%), newborn prophylaxis for newborn risk factors (29/133, 21.8%) and prophylaxis for surgical disease (15/133, 11.3%).

CONCLUSIONS

Based on our results, it appears that nothing has changed since the last PPS and that the quality improved targets, underlyined in previous studies, are always the same. Serial PPSs can be part of AMS strategies but they are not sufficient alone to produce changes in clinical practice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Infection and Immunity, Paediatric Infectious Disease Research Group, St. George's, University of London, London, England. chia88.te@gmail.com. Post graduate school of Paediatrics, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. chia88.te@gmail.com. Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children's University Hospital, Viale Pieraccini 24, 50139, Florence, Italy. chia88.te@gmail.com.Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children's University Hospital, Viale Pieraccini 24, 50139, Florence, Italy.Unit of Immune and Infectious Diseases, Academic Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy.Department of Pediatrics, La Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.Pediatric Clinic, Department of Surgical and Biomedical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.Institute for Infection and Immunity, Paediatric Infectious Disease Research Group, St. George's, University of London, London, England.Institute for Infection and Immunity, Paediatric Infectious Disease Research Group, St. George's, University of London, London, England.Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Anna Meyer Children's University Hospital, Viale Pieraccini 24, 50139, Florence, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31623633

Citation

Tersigni, Chiara, et al. "Antibiotic Prescriptions in Italian Hospitalised Children After Serial Point Prevalence Surveys (or Pointless Prevalence Surveys): Has Anything Actually Changed Over the Years?" Italian Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 45, no. 1, 2019, p. 127.
Tersigni C, Montagnani C, D'Argenio P, et al. Antibiotic prescriptions in Italian hospitalised children after serial point prevalence surveys (or pointless prevalence surveys): has anything actually changed over the years? Ital J Pediatr. 2019;45(1):127.
Tersigni, C., Montagnani, C., D'Argenio, P., Duse, M., Esposito, S., Hsia, Y., ... Galli, L. (2019). Antibiotic prescriptions in Italian hospitalised children after serial point prevalence surveys (or pointless prevalence surveys): has anything actually changed over the years? Italian Journal of Pediatrics, 45(1), p. 127. doi:10.1186/s13052-019-0722-y.
Tersigni C, et al. Antibiotic Prescriptions in Italian Hospitalised Children After Serial Point Prevalence Surveys (or Pointless Prevalence Surveys): Has Anything Actually Changed Over the Years. Ital J Pediatr. 2019 Oct 17;45(1):127. PubMed PMID: 31623633.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antibiotic prescriptions in Italian hospitalised children after serial point prevalence surveys (or pointless prevalence surveys): has anything actually changed over the years? AU - Tersigni,Chiara, AU - Montagnani,Carlotta, AU - D'Argenio,Patrizia, AU - Duse,Marzia, AU - Esposito,Susanna, AU - Hsia,Yingfen, AU - Sharland,Mike, AU - Galli,Luisa, Y1 - 2019/10/17/ PY - 2019/06/30/received PY - 2019/09/21/accepted PY - 2019/10/19/entrez PY - 2019/10/19/pubmed PY - 2019/10/19/medline KW - Antimicrobial stewardship KW - Antimicrobials KW - Children KW - Point prevalence surveys SP - 127 EP - 127 JF - Italian journal of pediatrics JO - Ital J Pediatr VL - 45 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Point prevalence surveys have been used in several studies to provide immediate and easily comparable information about antibiotic use and showed that about one third of hospitalised children had on ongoing antimicrobial prescription during their hospital admission. The aim of this study, as part of the Global Antimicrobial Resistance, Prescribing and Efficacy in Neonates and Children project, is to describe antimicrobial prescriptions among hospitalised children in four tertiary care hospitals in Italy to show if something has changed over the years. METHODS: Four tertiary care Italian's hospitals joined three Point Prevalence Surveys (PPSs) in three different period of the year. All children under 18 years of age with an ongoing antimicrobial prescription, admitted on the participating wards at 8 o'clock in the morning of the selecting day were enrolled. RESULTS: A total of 1412 patients (475 neonates and 937 children) were admitted in the days of three PPSs. Overall, among the total admitted patients, 565 patients (40%) had an ongoing antimicrobial prescription in the days of the survey A total of 718 antibiotics were administered in the 485 admitted children and 133 in neonates. The most common indications for antibiotic therapy in children was Lower respiratory tract infections (244/718, 34%), while in neonates were prophylaxis for medical problems (35/133, 26.3%), newborn prophylaxis for newborn risk factors (29/133, 21.8%) and prophylaxis for surgical disease (15/133, 11.3%). CONCLUSIONS: Based on our results, it appears that nothing has changed since the last PPS and that the quality improved targets, underlyined in previous studies, are always the same. Serial PPSs can be part of AMS strategies but they are not sufficient alone to produce changes in clinical practice. SN - 1824-7288 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31623633/Antibiotic_prescriptions_in_Italian_hospitalised_children_after_serial_point_prevalence_surveys_(or_pointless_prevalence_surveys):_has_anything_actually_changed_over_the_years L2 - https://ijponline.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13052-019-0722-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -