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Medicines prescription patterns in European neonatal units.

Abstract

Background Hospitalized neonates receive the highest number of drugs compared to all other age groups, but consumption rates vary between studies depending on patient characteristics and local practices. There are no large-scale international studies on drug use in neonatal units. Objective We aimed to describe drug use in European neonatal units and characterize its associations with geographic region and gestational age. Setting A one-day point prevalence study was performed as part of the European Study of Neonatal Exposure to Excipients from January to June 2012. Method All neonatal prescriptions and demographic data were registered in a web-based database. The impact of gestational age and region on prescription rate were analysed with logistic regression. Main outcome measure The number and variety of drugs prescribed to hospitalized neonates in different gestational age groups and geographic regions. Results In total, 21 European countries with 89 neonatal units participated. Altogether 2173 prescriptions given to 726 neonates were registered. The 10 drugs with the highest prescription rate were multivitamins, vitamin D, caffeine, gentamicin, amino acids for parenteral nutrition, phytomenadione, ampicillin, benzylpenicillin, fat emulsion for parenteral nutrition and probiotics. The six most commonly prescribed ATC groups (alimentary tract and metabolism, blood and blood-forming organs, systemic anti-infectives, nervous, respiratory and cardiovascular system) covered 98% of prescriptions. Gestational age significantly affected the use of all commonly used drug groups. Geographic region influenced the use of alimentary tract and metabolism, blood and blood-forming organs, systemic anti-infectives, nervous and respiratory system drugs. Conclusion While gestational age-dependent differences in neonatal drug use were expected, regional variations (except for systemic anti-infectives) indicate a need for cooperation in developing harmonized evidence-based guidelines and suggest priorities for collaborative work.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia. inge.mesek@ut.ee.Department of Paediatrics, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia. Neonatal Unit, Children's Clinic, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.Department of Microbiology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia. Pharmacy Department, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.Department of Paediatrics, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia. Clinic of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.Department of Paediatrics, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia. Neonatal Unit, Children's Clinic, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.Institute of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. Paediatric Medicines Research Unit (PMRU), Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK.Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. Paediatric Medicines Research Unit (PMRU), Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK.Paediatric Medicines Research Unit (PMRU), Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK.Department of Microbiology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31625122

Citation

Mesek, Inge, et al. "Medicines Prescription Patterns in European Neonatal Units." International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, 2019.
Mesek I, Nellis G, Lass J, et al. Medicines prescription patterns in European neonatal units. Int J Clin Pharm. 2019.
Mesek, I., Nellis, G., Lass, J., Metsvaht, T., Varendi, H., Visk, H., ... Lutsar, I. (2019). Medicines prescription patterns in European neonatal units. International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, doi:10.1007/s11096-019-00923-2.
Mesek I, et al. Medicines Prescription Patterns in European Neonatal Units. Int J Clin Pharm. 2019 Oct 17; PubMed PMID: 31625122.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medicines prescription patterns in European neonatal units. AU - Mesek,Inge, AU - Nellis,Georgi, AU - Lass,Jana, AU - Metsvaht,Tuuli, AU - Varendi,Heili, AU - Visk,Helle, AU - Turner,Mark A, AU - Nunn,Anthony J, AU - Duncan,Jennifer, AU - Lutsar,Irja, Y1 - 2019/10/17/ PY - 2019/03/14/received PY - 2019/10/09/accepted PY - 2019/10/19/entrez KW - Database KW - Europe KW - Exposure data KW - Infant KW - Neonatal pharmacotherapy KW - Neonatal unit JF - International journal of clinical pharmacy JO - Int J Clin Pharm N2 - Background Hospitalized neonates receive the highest number of drugs compared to all other age groups, but consumption rates vary between studies depending on patient characteristics and local practices. There are no large-scale international studies on drug use in neonatal units. Objective We aimed to describe drug use in European neonatal units and characterize its associations with geographic region and gestational age. Setting A one-day point prevalence study was performed as part of the European Study of Neonatal Exposure to Excipients from January to June 2012. Method All neonatal prescriptions and demographic data were registered in a web-based database. The impact of gestational age and region on prescription rate were analysed with logistic regression. Main outcome measure The number and variety of drugs prescribed to hospitalized neonates in different gestational age groups and geographic regions. Results In total, 21 European countries with 89 neonatal units participated. Altogether 2173 prescriptions given to 726 neonates were registered. The 10 drugs with the highest prescription rate were multivitamins, vitamin D, caffeine, gentamicin, amino acids for parenteral nutrition, phytomenadione, ampicillin, benzylpenicillin, fat emulsion for parenteral nutrition and probiotics. The six most commonly prescribed ATC groups (alimentary tract and metabolism, blood and blood-forming organs, systemic anti-infectives, nervous, respiratory and cardiovascular system) covered 98% of prescriptions. Gestational age significantly affected the use of all commonly used drug groups. Geographic region influenced the use of alimentary tract and metabolism, blood and blood-forming organs, systemic anti-infectives, nervous and respiratory system drugs. Conclusion While gestational age-dependent differences in neonatal drug use were expected, regional variations (except for systemic anti-infectives) indicate a need for cooperation in developing harmonized evidence-based guidelines and suggest priorities for collaborative work. SN - 2210-7711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31625122/Medicines_prescription_patterns_in_European_neonatal_units L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11096-019-00923-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -