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American College of Sports Medicine Roundtable Report on Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Cancer Prevention and Control.
Med Sci Sports Exerc 2019; 51(11):2391-2402MS

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The American College of Sports Medicine convened an International Multidisciplinary Roundtable on Exercise and Cancer in March 2018 to evaluate and translate the evidence linking physical activity and cancer prevention, treatment, and control. This article discusses findings from the Roundtable in relation to the biologic and epidemiologic evidence for the role of physical activity in cancer prevention and survival.

RESULTS

The evidence supports that there are a number of biologically plausible mechanisms, whereby physical activity can influence cancer risk, and that physical activity is beneficial for the prevention of several types of cancer including breast, colon, endometrial, kidney, bladder, esophageal, and stomach. Minimizing time spent in sedentary behavior may also lower risk of endometrial, colon and lung cancers. Conversely, physical activity is associated with higher risk of melanoma, a serious form of skin cancer. Further, physical activity before and after a cancer diagnosis is also likely to be relevant for improved survival for those diagnosed with breast and colon cancer; with data suggesting that postdiagnosis physical activity provides greater mortality benefits than prediagnosis physical activity.

CONCLUSIONS

Collectively, there is consistent, compelling evidence that physical activity plays a role in preventing many types of cancer and for improving longevity among cancer survivors, although the evidence related to higher risk of melanoma demonstrates the importance of sun safe practices while being physically active. Together, these findings underscore the importance of physical activity in cancer prevention and control. Fitness and public health professionals and health care providers worldwide are encouraged to spread the message to the general population and cancer survivors to be physically active as their age, abilities, and cancer status will allow.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Research, Cancer Control Alberta, Alberta Health Sciences, Calgary, CANADA.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA.Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, CANADA.Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR.George Mason University, Fairfax, VA.Office of Disease Prevention, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.Physical Activity and Health Branch, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.Department of Hematology/Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA.Department of Physical Therapy, Wingate University, Wingate, NC.Sunflower Wellness, San Francisco, CA.Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, Penn State University, Hershey, PA.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31626056

Citation

Patel, Alpa V., et al. "American College of Sports Medicine Roundtable Report On Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Cancer Prevention and Control." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 51, no. 11, 2019, pp. 2391-2402.
Patel AV, Friedenreich CM, Moore SC, et al. American College of Sports Medicine Roundtable Report on Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Cancer Prevention and Control. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2019;51(11):2391-2402.
Patel, A. V., Friedenreich, C. M., Moore, S. C., Hayes, S. C., Silver, J. K., Campbell, K. L., ... Matthews, C. E. (2019). American College of Sports Medicine Roundtable Report on Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Cancer Prevention and Control. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 51(11), pp. 2391-2402. doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000002117.
Patel AV, et al. American College of Sports Medicine Roundtable Report On Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Cancer Prevention and Control. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2019;51(11):2391-2402. PubMed PMID: 31626056.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - American College of Sports Medicine Roundtable Report on Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Cancer Prevention and Control. AU - Patel,Alpa V, AU - Friedenreich,Christine M, AU - Moore,Steven C, AU - Hayes,Sandra C, AU - Silver,Julie K, AU - Campbell,Kristin L, AU - Winters-Stone,Kerri, AU - Gerber,Lynn H, AU - George,Stephanie M, AU - Fulton,Janet E, AU - Denlinger,Crystal, AU - Morris,G Stephen, AU - Hue,Trisha, AU - Schmitz,Kathryn H, AU - Matthews,Charles E, PY - 2020/11/01/pmc-release PY - 2019/10/19/entrez PY - 2019/10/19/pubmed PY - 2019/10/19/medline SP - 2391 EP - 2402 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 51 IS - 11 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The American College of Sports Medicine convened an International Multidisciplinary Roundtable on Exercise and Cancer in March 2018 to evaluate and translate the evidence linking physical activity and cancer prevention, treatment, and control. This article discusses findings from the Roundtable in relation to the biologic and epidemiologic evidence for the role of physical activity in cancer prevention and survival. RESULTS: The evidence supports that there are a number of biologically plausible mechanisms, whereby physical activity can influence cancer risk, and that physical activity is beneficial for the prevention of several types of cancer including breast, colon, endometrial, kidney, bladder, esophageal, and stomach. Minimizing time spent in sedentary behavior may also lower risk of endometrial, colon and lung cancers. Conversely, physical activity is associated with higher risk of melanoma, a serious form of skin cancer. Further, physical activity before and after a cancer diagnosis is also likely to be relevant for improved survival for those diagnosed with breast and colon cancer; with data suggesting that postdiagnosis physical activity provides greater mortality benefits than prediagnosis physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, there is consistent, compelling evidence that physical activity plays a role in preventing many types of cancer and for improving longevity among cancer survivors, although the evidence related to higher risk of melanoma demonstrates the importance of sun safe practices while being physically active. Together, these findings underscore the importance of physical activity in cancer prevention and control. Fitness and public health professionals and health care providers worldwide are encouraged to spread the message to the general population and cancer survivors to be physically active as their age, abilities, and cancer status will allow. SN - 1530-0315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31626056/American_College_of_Sports_Medicine_Roundtable_Report_on_Physical_Activity,_Sedentary_Behavior,_and_Cancer_Prevention_and_Control L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000002117 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -