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Prenatal Omega-3 and Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Childhood Atopic Dermatitis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Atopic dermatitis is a common childhood disease, potentially influenced by prenatal nutritional exposures such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).

OBJECTIVE

In a racially diverse cohort, we hypothesized that childhood atopic dermatitis would be associated with higher prenatal omega-6 (n-6) and lower omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs.

METHODS

We included mother-child dyads, births 2006 to 2011, enrolled in the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development in Early Childhood cohort. Primary exposures included second trimester plasma n-3 and n-6 PUFA status and the ratio of the two (n-6:n-3). We assessed child current atopic dermatitis symptoms in the previous 12 months at age approximately 4 to 6 years. We investigated the association between PUFA exposures and atopic dermatitis using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. We assessed for effect modification by maternal prenatal smoking, atopic disease history, and child sex.

RESULTS

Among 1131 women, 67% were African American and 42% had an atopic disease history; 17% of children had atopic dermatitis. Higher prenatal n-6 PUFAs were associated with increased relative odds of child atopic dermatitis (adjusted odds ratio: 1.25; confidence interval: 1.01-1.54 per interquartile range difference), and interaction models demonstrated that this association was seen in dyads in which the women had a history of atopic disease. Neither prenatal n-3 PUFAs nor n-6:n-3 were associated with child atopic dermatitis.

CONCLUSION

In this racially diverse cohort, higher second trimester n-6 PUFAs were associated with atopic dermatitis in children of women with atopy. PUFAs may represent a modifiable risk factor for atopic dermatitis, particularly in individuals with a familial predisposition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn.Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn.Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Ga.Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, NY; Institute of Exposomic Research, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, NY.Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn.Division of General Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn; Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn.Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn; Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn.Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn.Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, Calif; Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, Calif.Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn.Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, Calif.Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, NY; Institute of Exposomic Research, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, NY.Division of General Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn; Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn. Electronic address: Kecia.Carroll@vumc.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31626989

Citation

Gardner, Kourtney G., et al. "Prenatal Omega-3 and Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Childhood Atopic Dermatitis." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. in Practice, 2019.
Gardner KG, Gebretsadik T, Hartman TJ, et al. Prenatal Omega-3 and Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Childhood Atopic Dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2019.
Gardner, K. G., Gebretsadik, T., Hartman, T. J., Rosa, M. J., Tylavsky, F. A., Adgent, M. A., ... Carroll, K. N. (2019). Prenatal Omega-3 and Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Childhood Atopic Dermatitis. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. in Practice, doi:10.1016/j.jaip.2019.09.031.
Gardner KG, et al. Prenatal Omega-3 and Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Childhood Atopic Dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2019 Oct 15; PubMed PMID: 31626989.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal Omega-3 and Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Childhood Atopic Dermatitis. AU - Gardner,Kourtney G, AU - Gebretsadik,Tebeb, AU - Hartman,Terryl J, AU - Rosa,Maria J, AU - Tylavsky,Frances A, AU - Adgent,Margaret A, AU - Moore,Paul E, AU - Kocak,Mehmet, AU - Bush,Nicole R, AU - Davis,Robert L, AU - Lewinn,Kaja Z, AU - Wright,Rosalind J, AU - Carroll,Kecia N, Y1 - 2019/10/15/ PY - 2019/07/18/received PY - 2019/09/16/revised PY - 2019/09/19/accepted PY - 2019/10/19/pubmed PY - 2019/10/19/medline PY - 2019/10/19/entrez KW - Atopic dermatitis KW - Child KW - Polyunsaturated fatty acids KW - Prenatal JF - The journal of allergy and clinical immunology. In practice JO - J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract N2 - BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis is a common childhood disease, potentially influenced by prenatal nutritional exposures such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). OBJECTIVE: In a racially diverse cohort, we hypothesized that childhood atopic dermatitis would be associated with higher prenatal omega-6 (n-6) and lower omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs. METHODS: We included mother-child dyads, births 2006 to 2011, enrolled in the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development in Early Childhood cohort. Primary exposures included second trimester plasma n-3 and n-6 PUFA status and the ratio of the two (n-6:n-3). We assessed child current atopic dermatitis symptoms in the previous 12 months at age approximately 4 to 6 years. We investigated the association between PUFA exposures and atopic dermatitis using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. We assessed for effect modification by maternal prenatal smoking, atopic disease history, and child sex. RESULTS: Among 1131 women, 67% were African American and 42% had an atopic disease history; 17% of children had atopic dermatitis. Higher prenatal n-6 PUFAs were associated with increased relative odds of child atopic dermatitis (adjusted odds ratio: 1.25; confidence interval: 1.01-1.54 per interquartile range difference), and interaction models demonstrated that this association was seen in dyads in which the women had a history of atopic disease. Neither prenatal n-3 PUFAs nor n-6:n-3 were associated with child atopic dermatitis. CONCLUSION: In this racially diverse cohort, higher second trimester n-6 PUFAs were associated with atopic dermatitis in children of women with atopy. PUFAs may represent a modifiable risk factor for atopic dermatitis, particularly in individuals with a familial predisposition. SN - 2213-2201 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31626989/Prenatal_Omega-3_And_Omega-6_Polyunsaturated_Fatty_Acids_And_Childhood_Atopic_Dermatitis L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2213-2198(19)30857-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -