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Absorbed dose calorimetry.

Abstract

This article reviews the development and summarizes the state-of-the-art in absorbed dose calorimetry for all the common clinical beam modalities covered in reference dosimetry codes of practice, as well as for small and nonstandard fields, and brachytherapy. It focuses primarily on work performed in the last ten years by national laboratories and research institutions and is not restricted to primary standard instruments. The most recent absorbed dose calorimetry review article was published over twenty years ago by Ross and Klassen (1996), and even then, its scope was limited to water calorimeters. Since the application of calorimetry to the measurement of radiation has a long and often overlooked history, a brief introduction into its origins is provided, along with a summary of some of the landmark research that have shaped the current landscape of absorbed dose calorimeters. Technical descriptions of water and graphite calorimetry are kept general, as these have been detailed extensively in relatively recent review articles (e.g., Seuntjens & Duane 2009, McEwen and DuSautoy 2009). The review categorizes calorimeters by the radiation type for which they are applied; from the widely established standards for Co-60 and high-energy x-rays, to the prototype calorimeters used in high-energy electrons and hadron therapy. In each case, focus is placed on the issues and constraints affecting dose measurement in that beam type, and the innovations developed to meet these requirements. For photons, electrons, proton and carbon ion beams, a summary of the ionization chamber beam quality conversion factors (kQ) determined using said calorimeters is also provided. The article closes with a look forward to some of the most promising new techniques and areas of research and speculates about the future clinical role of absorbed dose calorimetry.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA.Centre for Ionising Radiation Metrology, NPL, TEDDINGTON, Middlesex, TW11 0LW, Teddington, UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND.Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, CANADA.Medical Physics, McGill University, Cedars Cancer Centre, 1001 Décarie Boulevard, Montreal, Quebec, H4A 3J1, CANADA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31627202

Citation

Renaud, James, et al. "Absorbed Dose Calorimetry." Physics in Medicine and Biology, 2019.
Renaud J, Palmans H, Sarfehnia A, et al. Absorbed dose calorimetry. Phys Med Biol. 2019.
Renaud, J., Palmans, H., Sarfehnia, A., & Seuntjens, J. (2019). Absorbed dose calorimetry. Physics in Medicine and Biology, doi:10.1088/1361-6560/ab4f29.
Renaud J, et al. Absorbed Dose Calorimetry. Phys Med Biol. 2019 Oct 18; PubMed PMID: 31627202.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Absorbed dose calorimetry. AU - Renaud,James, AU - Palmans,Hugo, AU - Sarfehnia,Arman, AU - Seuntjens,Jan, Y1 - 2019/10/18/ PY - 2019/10/19/entrez PY - 2019/10/19/pubmed PY - 2019/10/19/medline KW - Monte Carlo KW - absolute dosimetry KW - beam quality conversion factors KW - calorimetry KW - dosimetry KW - primary dose standards KW - reference dosimetry JF - Physics in medicine and biology JO - Phys Med Biol N2 - This article reviews the development and summarizes the state-of-the-art in absorbed dose calorimetry for all the common clinical beam modalities covered in reference dosimetry codes of practice, as well as for small and nonstandard fields, and brachytherapy. It focuses primarily on work performed in the last ten years by national laboratories and research institutions and is not restricted to primary standard instruments. The most recent absorbed dose calorimetry review article was published over twenty years ago by Ross and Klassen (1996), and even then, its scope was limited to water calorimeters. Since the application of calorimetry to the measurement of radiation has a long and often overlooked history, a brief introduction into its origins is provided, along with a summary of some of the landmark research that have shaped the current landscape of absorbed dose calorimeters. Technical descriptions of water and graphite calorimetry are kept general, as these have been detailed extensively in relatively recent review articles (e.g., Seuntjens & Duane 2009, McEwen and DuSautoy 2009). The review categorizes calorimeters by the radiation type for which they are applied; from the widely established standards for Co-60 and high-energy x-rays, to the prototype calorimeters used in high-energy electrons and hadron therapy. In each case, focus is placed on the issues and constraints affecting dose measurement in that beam type, and the innovations developed to meet these requirements. For photons, electrons, proton and carbon ion beams, a summary of the ionization chamber beam quality conversion factors (kQ) determined using said calorimeters is also provided. The article closes with a look forward to some of the most promising new techniques and areas of research and speculates about the future clinical role of absorbed dose calorimetry. SN - 1361-6560 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31627202/Absorbed_dose_calorimetry L2 - https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6560/ab4f29 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -