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Daily patterns in nonsuicidal self-injury and coping among recently hospitalized youth at risk for suicide.
Psychiatry Res. 2019 11; 281:112588.PR

Abstract

Among adolescents at high suicide risk, using a daily diary design, this study examined: (1) the co-occurrence between nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal ideation, (2) the link between NSSI and coping, and (3) endorsement of using NSSI to cope with suicidal ideation (anti-suicide function). Thirty-four adolescents hospitalized due to suicide risk (76% female; ages 13-17) responded to daily surveys for four weeks after discharge (n = 650 observations). NSSI was positively associated with suicidal ideation at the between- (i.e. relative to others) and within-person (relative to adolescents' own average) levels of analysis. When NSSI and suicidal thoughts co-occurred, adolescents used NSSI to cope with thoughts of suicide on nearly all occasions. While adolescents did not use less adaptive coping when they engaged in NSSI (i.e. within-person), youth who utilized more coping strategies in general (i.e. between-person) had lower probability of NSSI. The probability of NSSI also decreased when adolescents perceived coping to be helpful and for youth who generally tended to perceive coping as helpful. Findings offer fine-grained insights about the intersection of NSSI, suicidal thoughts, and coping among high-risk adolescents, adding to the body of research highlighting the benefit of broadening adolescents' coping strategies as well as assessing their perceived utility.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States. Electronic address: ewac@umich.edu.Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, United States.Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States; Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31629299

Citation

Czyz, E K., et al. "Daily Patterns in Nonsuicidal Self-injury and Coping Among Recently Hospitalized Youth at Risk for Suicide." Psychiatry Research, vol. 281, 2019, p. 112588.
Czyz EK, Glenn CR, Busby D, et al. Daily patterns in nonsuicidal self-injury and coping among recently hospitalized youth at risk for suicide. Psychiatry Res. 2019;281:112588.
Czyz, E. K., Glenn, C. R., Busby, D., & King, C. A. (2019). Daily patterns in nonsuicidal self-injury and coping among recently hospitalized youth at risk for suicide. Psychiatry Research, 281, 112588. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2019.112588
Czyz EK, et al. Daily Patterns in Nonsuicidal Self-injury and Coping Among Recently Hospitalized Youth at Risk for Suicide. Psychiatry Res. 2019;281:112588. PubMed PMID: 31629299.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Daily patterns in nonsuicidal self-injury and coping among recently hospitalized youth at risk for suicide. AU - Czyz,E K, AU - Glenn,C R, AU - Busby,D, AU - King,C A, Y1 - 2019/09/27/ PY - 2019/06/09/received PY - 2019/09/23/revised PY - 2019/09/26/accepted PY - 2019/10/20/pubmed PY - 2020/4/15/medline PY - 2019/10/20/entrez KW - Adolescents KW - Coping KW - Daily diary KW - Nonsuicidal self-injury KW - Suicide SP - 112588 EP - 112588 JF - Psychiatry research JO - Psychiatry Res VL - 281 N2 - Among adolescents at high suicide risk, using a daily diary design, this study examined: (1) the co-occurrence between nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal ideation, (2) the link between NSSI and coping, and (3) endorsement of using NSSI to cope with suicidal ideation (anti-suicide function). Thirty-four adolescents hospitalized due to suicide risk (76% female; ages 13-17) responded to daily surveys for four weeks after discharge (n = 650 observations). NSSI was positively associated with suicidal ideation at the between- (i.e. relative to others) and within-person (relative to adolescents' own average) levels of analysis. When NSSI and suicidal thoughts co-occurred, adolescents used NSSI to cope with thoughts of suicide on nearly all occasions. While adolescents did not use less adaptive coping when they engaged in NSSI (i.e. within-person), youth who utilized more coping strategies in general (i.e. between-person) had lower probability of NSSI. The probability of NSSI also decreased when adolescents perceived coping to be helpful and for youth who generally tended to perceive coping as helpful. Findings offer fine-grained insights about the intersection of NSSI, suicidal thoughts, and coping among high-risk adolescents, adding to the body of research highlighting the benefit of broadening adolescents' coping strategies as well as assessing their perceived utility. SN - 1872-7123 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31629299/Daily_patterns_in_nonsuicidal_self_injury_and_coping_among_recently_hospitalized_youth_at_risk_for_suicide_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-1781(19)31272-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -