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Covariation bias in depression - a predictor of treatment response?
J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2019; 126(12):1653-1665JN

Abstract

Covariation bias, defined as an overestimation of the relationship between fear-relevant stimuli and aversive consequences, is a well-investigated cognitive bias in anxiety disorders. As patients with affective disorders also show biased information processing, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether depressed patients also display a covariation bias between negative stimuli and aversive consequences. Covariation estimates of 62 inpatients with a current severe depressive episode were assessed at admission (n = 31) or after 6 weeks of treatment (n = 31) and were compared in a between-group design with 31 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. All participants showed a covariation bias for the relationship between negative stimuli and aversive consequences. Moreover, covariation bias at admission was significantly associated with various clinician- and self-reported dimensional measures of treatment response assessed 6 weeks later (Global Assessment of Functioning, Clinical Global Impression Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory), i.e., patients with a stronger bias showed greater impairment after 6 weeks of treatment. Categorical analyses revealed that overall, treatment non-responders-but not responders-were characterized by a covariation bias. The naturalistic study design without standardized pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments is a central limitation. We conclude that the covariation bias may constitute a possible marker in the field of emotional information processing in the search for effective predictors of therapy outcome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Center of Mental Health, University Hospital of Würzburg, Margarete-Höppel-Platz 1, 97080, Würzburg, Germany.Department of Biological Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Center of Mental Health, University of Würzburg, Marcusstr. 9-11, 97070, Würzburg, Germany.Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Center of Mental Health, University Hospital of Würzburg, Margarete-Höppel-Platz 1, 97080, Würzburg, Germany.Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Center of Mental Health, University Hospital of Würzburg, Margarete-Höppel-Platz 1, 97080, Würzburg, Germany.Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Center of Mental Health, University Hospital of Würzburg, Margarete-Höppel-Platz 1, 97080, Würzburg, Germany. Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research, University Hospital of Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 2, 97080, Würzburg, Germany. Comprehensive Hearth Failure Center (CHFC), University Hospital of Würzburg, Am Schwarzenberg 15, 97078, Würzburg, Germany.Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Center of Mental Health, University Hospital of Würzburg, Margarete-Höppel-Platz 1, 97080, Würzburg, Germany. Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research, University Hospital of Würzburg, Josef-Schneider-Str. 2, 97080, Würzburg, Germany. Comprehensive Hearth Failure Center (CHFC), University Hospital of Würzburg, Am Schwarzenberg 15, 97078, Würzburg, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Center, University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, Hauptstr. 5, 79104, Freiburg, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Center, University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, Hauptstr. 5, 79104, Freiburg, Germany.Department of Biological Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Center of Mental Health, University of Würzburg, Marcusstr. 9-11, 97070, Würzburg, Germany. pauli@psychologie.uni-wuerzburg.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31630255

Citation

Stonawski, Saskia, et al. "Covariation Bias in Depression - a Predictor of Treatment Response?" Journal of Neural Transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996), vol. 126, no. 12, 2019, pp. 1653-1665.
Stonawski S, Wiemer J, Wurst C, et al. Covariation bias in depression - a predictor of treatment response? J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2019;126(12):1653-1665.
Stonawski, S., Wiemer, J., Wurst, C., Reitz, J., Hommers, L., Menke, A., ... Pauli, P. (2019). Covariation bias in depression - a predictor of treatment response? Journal of Neural Transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996), 126(12), pp. 1653-1665. doi:10.1007/s00702-019-02091-z.
Stonawski S, et al. Covariation Bias in Depression - a Predictor of Treatment Response. J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2019;126(12):1653-1665. PubMed PMID: 31630255.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Covariation bias in depression - a predictor of treatment response? AU - Stonawski,Saskia, AU - Wiemer,Julian, AU - Wurst,Catherina, AU - Reitz,Jannika, AU - Hommers,Leif, AU - Menke,Andreas, AU - Domschke,Katharina, AU - Schiele,Miriam A, AU - Pauli,Paul, Y1 - 2019/10/19/ PY - 2019/02/11/received PY - 2019/10/06/accepted PY - 2019/10/21/pubmed PY - 2019/10/21/medline PY - 2019/10/21/entrez KW - Affective disorders KW - Covariation bias KW - Severe depressive episode KW - Treatment response SP - 1653 EP - 1665 JF - Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) JO - J Neural Transm (Vienna) VL - 126 IS - 12 N2 - Covariation bias, defined as an overestimation of the relationship between fear-relevant stimuli and aversive consequences, is a well-investigated cognitive bias in anxiety disorders. As patients with affective disorders also show biased information processing, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether depressed patients also display a covariation bias between negative stimuli and aversive consequences. Covariation estimates of 62 inpatients with a current severe depressive episode were assessed at admission (n = 31) or after 6 weeks of treatment (n = 31) and were compared in a between-group design with 31 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. All participants showed a covariation bias for the relationship between negative stimuli and aversive consequences. Moreover, covariation bias at admission was significantly associated with various clinician- and self-reported dimensional measures of treatment response assessed 6 weeks later (Global Assessment of Functioning, Clinical Global Impression Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory), i.e., patients with a stronger bias showed greater impairment after 6 weeks of treatment. Categorical analyses revealed that overall, treatment non-responders-but not responders-were characterized by a covariation bias. The naturalistic study design without standardized pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments is a central limitation. We conclude that the covariation bias may constitute a possible marker in the field of emotional information processing in the search for effective predictors of therapy outcome. SN - 1435-1463 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31630255/Covariation_bias_in_depression_-_a_predictor_of_treatment_response L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00702-019-02091-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -