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The Two Faces of Relaxin in Cancer: Antitumor or Protumor?
Hepatology 2019Hep

Abstract

The liver is one of the most common sites of metastatic disease from a variety of primary tumors including colorectal cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), melanoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer. Moreover, metastatic disease to the liver is a leading cause of death in patients with malignancy. The liver has ample unique features favoring metastatic colonization by cancer (e.g. high blood flow, source of nutrients, etc.) especially the ability to induce immune tolerance. This tolerogenic capability is also important in cancer biology as tumors can commandeer this machinery, fostering a protumor and prometastatic microenvironment.1 However, what cells constitute this favorable metastatic niche and whether they can be therapeutically targeted remain open questions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31630431

Citation

Rizvi, Sumera, and Gregory J. Gores. "The Two Faces of Relaxin in Cancer: Antitumor or Protumor?" Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.), 2019.
Rizvi S, Gores GJ. The Two Faces of Relaxin in Cancer: Antitumor or Protumor? Hepatology. 2019.
Rizvi, S., & Gores, G. J. (2019). The Two Faces of Relaxin in Cancer: Antitumor or Protumor? Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.), doi:10.1002/hep.30998.
Rizvi S, Gores GJ. The Two Faces of Relaxin in Cancer: Antitumor or Protumor. Hepatology. 2019 Oct 20; PubMed PMID: 31630431.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Two Faces of Relaxin in Cancer: Antitumor or Protumor? AU - Rizvi,Sumera, AU - Gores,Gregory J, Y1 - 2019/10/20/ PY - 2019/10/21/entrez PY - 2019/10/21/pubmed PY - 2019/10/21/medline JF - Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.) JO - Hepatology N2 - The liver is one of the most common sites of metastatic disease from a variety of primary tumors including colorectal cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), melanoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer. Moreover, metastatic disease to the liver is a leading cause of death in patients with malignancy. The liver has ample unique features favoring metastatic colonization by cancer (e.g. high blood flow, source of nutrients, etc.) especially the ability to induce immune tolerance. This tolerogenic capability is also important in cancer biology as tumors can commandeer this machinery, fostering a protumor and prometastatic microenvironment.1 However, what cells constitute this favorable metastatic niche and whether they can be therapeutically targeted remain open questions. SN - 1527-3350 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31630431/The_Two_Faces_of_Relaxin_in_Cancer:_Antitumor_or_Protumor L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.30998 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -