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Current practice trends of oedema management in the hands of people with tetraplegia in Australia.

Abstract

Study design

Survey research design.

Objectives

To describe current practice methods for oedema management in people with tetraplegia.

Setting

Australia.

Methods

Online survey with open and closed questions regarding clinical practice trends in the assessment and treatment of oedema in the hands in people with tetraplegia.

Results

Seventeen occupational therapists working in spinal cord injury (SCI) in Australia completed the survey. Oedema was identified by visual inspection (n = 17, 100%) and recorded using circumferential tape measurement (n = 13, 76%). Elevation was used by all participants in conjunction with compression gloves (n = 13, 76%), retrograde massage (n = 13, 76%), compression bandaging (n = 12, 71%) and the boxing glove splint (n = 9, 53%). Participants stated that oedema presented challenges to patients with difficulty exercising (n = 11, 65%), changes to body image (n = 5, 29%) and pain (n = 4, 24%).

Conclusion

Assessment and treatment practices were not consistent. Oedema in the hands in people with tetraplegia was perceived to have various impacts on a person's rehabilitation and hand function. The findings highlight the need for research evidence to guide practice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD Australia. 2Occupational Therapy department, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD Australia.1School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD Australia. 3School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD Australia.1School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD Australia. Community and Oral Health, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, QLD Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31632729

Citation

Oh, Soo, et al. "Current Practice Trends of Oedema Management in the Hands of People With Tetraplegia in Australia." Spinal Cord Series and Cases, vol. 5, 2019, p. 71.
Oh S, Gustafsson L, Eames S. Current practice trends of oedema management in the hands of people with tetraplegia in Australia. Spinal Cord Ser Cases. 2019;5:71.
Oh, S., Gustafsson, L., & Eames, S. (2019). Current practice trends of oedema management in the hands of people with tetraplegia in Australia. Spinal Cord Series and Cases, 5, p. 71. doi:10.1038/s41394-019-0215-7.
Oh S, Gustafsson L, Eames S. Current Practice Trends of Oedema Management in the Hands of People With Tetraplegia in Australia. Spinal Cord Ser Cases. 2019;5:71. PubMed PMID: 31632729.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Current practice trends of oedema management in the hands of people with tetraplegia in Australia. AU - Oh,Soo, AU - Gustafsson,Louise, AU - Eames,Sally, Y1 - 2019/08/07/ PY - 2019/02/28/received PY - 2019/06/05/revised PY - 2019/07/18/accepted PY - 2020/08/07/pmc-release PY - 2019/10/22/entrez PY - 2019/10/22/pubmed PY - 2019/10/22/medline KW - Oedema KW - Quality of life SP - 71 EP - 71 JF - Spinal cord series and cases JO - Spinal Cord Ser Cases VL - 5 N2 - Study design: Survey research design. Objectives: To describe current practice methods for oedema management in people with tetraplegia. Setting: Australia. Methods: Online survey with open and closed questions regarding clinical practice trends in the assessment and treatment of oedema in the hands in people with tetraplegia. Results: Seventeen occupational therapists working in spinal cord injury (SCI) in Australia completed the survey. Oedema was identified by visual inspection (n = 17, 100%) and recorded using circumferential tape measurement (n = 13, 76%). Elevation was used by all participants in conjunction with compression gloves (n = 13, 76%), retrograde massage (n = 13, 76%), compression bandaging (n = 12, 71%) and the boxing glove splint (n = 9, 53%). Participants stated that oedema presented challenges to patients with difficulty exercising (n = 11, 65%), changes to body image (n = 5, 29%) and pain (n = 4, 24%). Conclusion: Assessment and treatment practices were not consistent. Oedema in the hands in people with tetraplegia was perceived to have various impacts on a person's rehabilitation and hand function. The findings highlight the need for research evidence to guide practice. SN - 2058-6124 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31632729/Current_practice_trends_of_oedema_management_in_the_hands_of_people_with_tetraplegia_in_Australia DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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