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Relevance of the interpersonal theory of suicide in an adolescent psychiatric inpatient population.
Psychiatry Res. 2019 11; 281:112590.PR

Abstract

The interpersonal theory of suicide (IPTS) has been widely studied in adults, but not adolescent populations at acute risk for suicide. Accordingly, this study aimed to evaluate IPTS clinical utility in a high-risk sample of suicidal adolescent inpatients. We assessed whether constructs of the IPTS (1) are associated with suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs) on admission to a psychiatric hospitalization, and (2) prospectively predict suicide attempt (SA) or psychiatric rehospitalization 90 days after discharge. On admission, adolescent patients self-reported recent STBs, perceived burdensomeness (PB), thwarted belongingness (TB), and depression. Parents reported their child's rehospitalization and suicide attempts 90 days after discharge. Generalized linear regression modelling was used to determine how key constructs of the IPTS are associated with STBs prior to admission and whether they prospectively predict SA or rehospitalization 90 days after discharge. IPTS constructs did not predict rehospitalization or SA within 90 days of discharge. Although PB and TB interacted to associate with prehospitalization SI frequency, and PB, TB and NSSI interacted to associate with prehospitalization SA, the nature of these interactions were not as the IPTS predicts. IPTS constructs are relevant proximal predictors of prehospitalization STB in adolescents, but may operate differently than in adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Franciscan Children's, 30 Warren St, Brighton, MA 02135, USA; McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St., Belmont, MA 02478, USA. Electronic address: cking@mclean.harvard.edu.Franciscan Children's, 30 Warren St, Brighton, MA 02135, USA. Electronic address: vjoyce@franciscanchildrens.org.Department of Psychology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Tillett Hall, Room 627, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA. Electronic address: evan.kleiman@rutgers.edu.Franciscan Children's, 30 Warren St, Brighton, MA 02135, USA; McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St., Belmont, MA 02478, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck St. Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: rbuonopane@franciscanchildrens.org.Franciscan Children's, 30 Warren St, Brighton, MA 02135, USA; Department of Psychology, Harvard University, 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Electronic address: amillner@fas.harvard.edu.Franciscan Children's, 30 Warren St, Brighton, MA 02135, USA. Electronic address: cnash@franciscanchildrens.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31634732

Citation

King, Christopher D., et al. "Relevance of the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide in an Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Population." Psychiatry Research, vol. 281, 2019, p. 112590.
King CD, Joyce VW, Kleiman EM, et al. Relevance of the interpersonal theory of suicide in an adolescent psychiatric inpatient population. Psychiatry Res. 2019;281:112590.
King, C. D., Joyce, V. W., Kleiman, E. M., Buonopane, R. J., Millner, A. J., & Nash, C. C. (2019). Relevance of the interpersonal theory of suicide in an adolescent psychiatric inpatient population. Psychiatry Research, 281, 112590. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2019.112590
King CD, et al. Relevance of the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide in an Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Population. Psychiatry Res. 2019;281:112590. PubMed PMID: 31634732.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relevance of the interpersonal theory of suicide in an adolescent psychiatric inpatient population. AU - King,Christopher D, AU - Joyce,Victoria W, AU - Kleiman,Evan M, AU - Buonopane,Ralph J, AU - Millner,Alexander J, AU - Nash,Carol C, Y1 - 2019/10/02/ PY - 2019/04/19/received PY - 2019/09/27/revised PY - 2019/09/28/accepted PY - 2019/10/22/pubmed PY - 2020/4/15/medline PY - 2019/10/22/entrez KW - Acquired capability KW - Perceived burdensomeness KW - Psychiatric rehospitalization KW - Suicidal ideation KW - Suicidal thoughts and behaviors KW - Suicide attempt KW - Thwarted belongingness SP - 112590 EP - 112590 JF - Psychiatry research JO - Psychiatry Res VL - 281 N2 - The interpersonal theory of suicide (IPTS) has been widely studied in adults, but not adolescent populations at acute risk for suicide. Accordingly, this study aimed to evaluate IPTS clinical utility in a high-risk sample of suicidal adolescent inpatients. We assessed whether constructs of the IPTS (1) are associated with suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs) on admission to a psychiatric hospitalization, and (2) prospectively predict suicide attempt (SA) or psychiatric rehospitalization 90 days after discharge. On admission, adolescent patients self-reported recent STBs, perceived burdensomeness (PB), thwarted belongingness (TB), and depression. Parents reported their child's rehospitalization and suicide attempts 90 days after discharge. Generalized linear regression modelling was used to determine how key constructs of the IPTS are associated with STBs prior to admission and whether they prospectively predict SA or rehospitalization 90 days after discharge. IPTS constructs did not predict rehospitalization or SA within 90 days of discharge. Although PB and TB interacted to associate with prehospitalization SI frequency, and PB, TB and NSSI interacted to associate with prehospitalization SA, the nature of these interactions were not as the IPTS predicts. IPTS constructs are relevant proximal predictors of prehospitalization STB in adolescents, but may operate differently than in adults. SN - 1872-7123 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31634732/Relevance_of_the_interpersonal_theory_of_suicide_in_an_adolescent_psychiatric_inpatient_population_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-1781(19)30888-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -