Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Leptospira spp. and Toxoplasma gondii in stranded representatives of wild cetaceans in the Philippines.
BMC Vet Res. 2019 Oct 26; 15(1):372.BV

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The stranding events of cetaceans in the Philippines provide opportunities for gathering biological information and specimens, especially from the pelagic forms. As part of an effort to monitor the health of wild cetaceans, this study detected Leptospira spp. and Toxoplasma gondii, causative agents of the emerging zoonotic diseases leptospirosis and toxoplasmosis respectively, in their stranded representatives. From October 2016-August 2018, 40 cetaceans (representing 14 species) that stranded nationwide were sampled for brain, cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, kidney, and blood tissues, urine, and sera. These were subjected to molecular, serological, culture, and histopathological analyses to detect the target pathogens.

RESULTS

T. gondii was detected in 20 (71%) of the 28 cetaceans with biological samples subjected to either molecular detection through RE gene amplification or IgG antibodies detection through agglutination-based serological assay. On the other hand, Leptospira was detected in 18 (64%) of 28 cetaceans with biological samples subjected to bacterial culture, molecular detection through 16S rDNA amplification, or IgM antibodies detection through ELISA-based serological assay.

CONCLUSIONS

There is the plausibility of toxoplasmosis and leptospirosis in cetacean populations found in the Philippines, however, acute or chronic phases of infections in sampled stranded individuals cannot be confirmed in the absence of supporting pathological observations and corroborating detection tests. Further studies should look for more evidences of pathogenicity, and explore the specific mechanisms by which pelagic cetacean species become infected by Leptospira spp. and T. gondii. As there is growing evidence on the role of cetaceans as sentinels of land-sea movement of emerging pathogens and the diseases they cause, any opportunity, such as their stranding events, should be maximized to investigate the health of their populations. Moreover, the role of leptospirosis or toxoplasmosis in these stranding events must be considered.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Biology, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, 1101, Philippines. mmobusan@up.edu.ph. Natural Sciences Research Institute, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, 1101, Philippines. mmobusan@up.edu.ph.Institute of Biology, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, 1101, Philippines. Natural Sciences Research Institute, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, 1101, Philippines.Institute of Environmental Science and Meteorology, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, 1101, Philippines.Institute of Biology, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, 1101, Philippines. Natural Sciences Research Institute, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, 1101, Philippines.Natural Sciences Research Institute, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, 1101, Philippines. Institute of Environmental Science and Meteorology, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, 1101, Philippines.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31655601

Citation

Obusan, Marie Christine M., et al. "Leptospira Spp. and Toxoplasma Gondii in Stranded Representatives of Wild Cetaceans in the Philippines." BMC Veterinary Research, vol. 15, no. 1, 2019, p. 372.
Obusan MCM, Villanueva RMD, Siringan MAT, et al. Leptospira spp. and Toxoplasma gondii in stranded representatives of wild cetaceans in the Philippines. BMC Vet Res. 2019;15(1):372.
Obusan, M. C. M., Villanueva, R. M. D., Siringan, M. A. T., Rivera, W. L., & Aragones, L. V. (2019). Leptospira spp. and Toxoplasma gondii in stranded representatives of wild cetaceans in the Philippines. BMC Veterinary Research, 15(1), 372. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-019-2112-5
Obusan MCM, et al. Leptospira Spp. and Toxoplasma Gondii in Stranded Representatives of Wild Cetaceans in the Philippines. BMC Vet Res. 2019 Oct 26;15(1):372. PubMed PMID: 31655601.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Leptospira spp. and Toxoplasma gondii in stranded representatives of wild cetaceans in the Philippines. AU - Obusan,Marie Christine M, AU - Villanueva,Ren Mark D, AU - Siringan,Maria Auxilia T, AU - Rivera,Windell L, AU - Aragones,Lemnuel V, Y1 - 2019/10/26/ PY - 2018/09/27/received PY - 2019/09/24/accepted PY - 2019/10/28/entrez PY - 2019/10/28/pubmed PY - 2020/2/23/medline KW - Cetaceans KW - Leptospira spp. KW - Philippines KW - Stranding events KW - Toxoplasma gondii SP - 372 EP - 372 JF - BMC veterinary research JO - BMC Vet Res VL - 15 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The stranding events of cetaceans in the Philippines provide opportunities for gathering biological information and specimens, especially from the pelagic forms. As part of an effort to monitor the health of wild cetaceans, this study detected Leptospira spp. and Toxoplasma gondii, causative agents of the emerging zoonotic diseases leptospirosis and toxoplasmosis respectively, in their stranded representatives. From October 2016-August 2018, 40 cetaceans (representing 14 species) that stranded nationwide were sampled for brain, cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, kidney, and blood tissues, urine, and sera. These were subjected to molecular, serological, culture, and histopathological analyses to detect the target pathogens. RESULTS: T. gondii was detected in 20 (71%) of the 28 cetaceans with biological samples subjected to either molecular detection through RE gene amplification or IgG antibodies detection through agglutination-based serological assay. On the other hand, Leptospira was detected in 18 (64%) of 28 cetaceans with biological samples subjected to bacterial culture, molecular detection through 16S rDNA amplification, or IgM antibodies detection through ELISA-based serological assay. CONCLUSIONS: There is the plausibility of toxoplasmosis and leptospirosis in cetacean populations found in the Philippines, however, acute or chronic phases of infections in sampled stranded individuals cannot be confirmed in the absence of supporting pathological observations and corroborating detection tests. Further studies should look for more evidences of pathogenicity, and explore the specific mechanisms by which pelagic cetacean species become infected by Leptospira spp. and T. gondii. As there is growing evidence on the role of cetaceans as sentinels of land-sea movement of emerging pathogens and the diseases they cause, any opportunity, such as their stranding events, should be maximized to investigate the health of their populations. Moreover, the role of leptospirosis or toxoplasmosis in these stranding events must be considered. SN - 1746-6148 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31655601/Leptospira_spp__and_Toxoplasma_gondii_in_stranded_representatives_of_wild_cetaceans_in_the_Philippines_ L2 - https://bmcvetres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12917-019-2112-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -