Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Uptake of funded influenza vaccines in young Australian children in 2018; parental characteristics, information seeking and attitudes.
Vaccine. 2020 01 10; 38(2):180-186.V

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Infants and children under 5-years are at an increased risk of complications from influenza. We aimed to evaluate characteristics associated with uptake of Australian state and territory funded influenza vaccine programs in 2018 for children aged 6-months to 5-years.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A national online survey of 1002 Australian parents with at least one child aged between 6-months and 5-years (response rate 29.9%). A 23-item online questionnaire asked parents about health service use, 2017 and 2018 influenza vaccine uptake, and routine childhood vaccine status for their youngest child. Parents were also asked a range of questions about their demographics, sources of vaccine information, and beliefs and attitudes towards immunisation.

RESULTS

A total of 1002 parents completed the questionnaire and 52.9% of children aged 6-months to 5-years in our sample were immunised against influenza in 2018; representing a significant increase from 2017. Knowing the vaccine was free for their child, and being influenced by a pharmacist increased the likelihood that their child received the influenza vaccine. Not receiving an influenza vaccine recommendation from a health care provider significantly reduced the likelihood of immunisation. Some parents were worried about the safety of the influenza vaccine for their child (36.4%), while 26.5% of parents agreed that you can catch influenza from the vaccine.

CONCLUSIONS

Uptake of influenza vaccine for Australian children aged 6-months to 5-years increased significantly in 2018. Continuing efforts to build parents' trust in childhood influenza vaccination are still required. Increasing opportunities for health care providers to recommend vaccination will lead to further improvements in uptake for young children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, 235 Jones Street, Ultimo, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: jane.frawley@uts.edu.au.Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, 235 Jones Street, Ultimo, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: km4259@nyu.edu.Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, 235 Jones Street, Ultimo, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: erica.mcintyre@uts.edu.au.School of Public Health & Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Randwick, Australia. Electronic address: h.seale@unsw.edu.au.Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, 235 Jones Street, Ultimo, NSW, Australia; Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: elizabeth.sullivan@uts.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31668365

Citation

Frawley, Jane E., et al. "Uptake of Funded Influenza Vaccines in Young Australian Children in 2018; Parental Characteristics, Information Seeking and Attitudes." Vaccine, vol. 38, no. 2, 2020, pp. 180-186.
Frawley JE, McManus K, McIntyre E, et al. Uptake of funded influenza vaccines in young Australian children in 2018; parental characteristics, information seeking and attitudes. Vaccine. 2020;38(2):180-186.
Frawley, J. E., McManus, K., McIntyre, E., Seale, H., & Sullivan, E. (2020). Uptake of funded influenza vaccines in young Australian children in 2018; parental characteristics, information seeking and attitudes. Vaccine, 38(2), 180-186. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.10.033
Frawley JE, et al. Uptake of Funded Influenza Vaccines in Young Australian Children in 2018; Parental Characteristics, Information Seeking and Attitudes. Vaccine. 2020 01 10;38(2):180-186. PubMed PMID: 31668365.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Uptake of funded influenza vaccines in young Australian children in 2018; parental characteristics, information seeking and attitudes. AU - Frawley,Jane E, AU - McManus,Korie, AU - McIntyre,Erica, AU - Seale,Holly, AU - Sullivan,Elizabeth, Y1 - 2019/10/23/ PY - 2019/07/04/received PY - 2019/09/26/revised PY - 2019/10/11/accepted PY - 2019/11/2/pubmed PY - 2021/2/10/medline PY - 2019/11/1/entrez KW - Children KW - Immunisation KW - Infants KW - Influenza KW - Vaccination KW - Vaccine SP - 180 EP - 186 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 38 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Infants and children under 5-years are at an increased risk of complications from influenza. We aimed to evaluate characteristics associated with uptake of Australian state and territory funded influenza vaccine programs in 2018 for children aged 6-months to 5-years. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A national online survey of 1002 Australian parents with at least one child aged between 6-months and 5-years (response rate 29.9%). A 23-item online questionnaire asked parents about health service use, 2017 and 2018 influenza vaccine uptake, and routine childhood vaccine status for their youngest child. Parents were also asked a range of questions about their demographics, sources of vaccine information, and beliefs and attitudes towards immunisation. RESULTS: A total of 1002 parents completed the questionnaire and 52.9% of children aged 6-months to 5-years in our sample were immunised against influenza in 2018; representing a significant increase from 2017. Knowing the vaccine was free for their child, and being influenced by a pharmacist increased the likelihood that their child received the influenza vaccine. Not receiving an influenza vaccine recommendation from a health care provider significantly reduced the likelihood of immunisation. Some parents were worried about the safety of the influenza vaccine for their child (36.4%), while 26.5% of parents agreed that you can catch influenza from the vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: Uptake of influenza vaccine for Australian children aged 6-months to 5-years increased significantly in 2018. Continuing efforts to build parents' trust in childhood influenza vaccination are still required. Increasing opportunities for health care providers to recommend vaccination will lead to further improvements in uptake for young children. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31668365/Uptake_of_funded_influenza_vaccines_in_young_Australian_children_in_2018 L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(19)31406-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -