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Ecological momentary assessment of the snacking environments of children from racially/ethnically diverse households.
Appetite. 2020 02 01; 145:104497.A

Abstract

Children consume nearly one-third of their daily energy intake as snacks (i.e., eating occasions that occur between meals); thus there is a growing interest in understanding what snacking occasions look like in the homes of young children. This study makes use of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to 1) examine differences in the contextual factors, including location, food preparation style, people present, presence of media devices, and overall atmosphere, between meal and snack occasions; and 2) explore differences in the context of snacking occasions across children's gender and weight status. Data for the current study came from the Family Matters Study, which included 150 families with children aged 5-7 years old (n = 25 from each of the following groups: Black/African American, Hispanic, Hmong, Native American, Somali, White). Parents completed an 8-day EMA observation period, during which they were surveyed after each eating occasion with the study child; questions explored contextual factors including location, food preparation style, people present, presence of media devices, and the overall atmosphere of each eating occasion. Differences between meals and snacks were observed; a smaller percentage of snacks (compared to meals) were prepared by the parent, consisted of only homemade food, and were planned ahead of time, as opposed to being served in response to a child's request. Snacks were more likely than other meals to be eaten on the couch and in the presence of a screen. Furthermore, important differences in snacking context were observed by child gender and weight status. Findings illuminate opportunities to improve children's overall dietary intake via interventions focused on improving the quality of foods served during snacks, as well as the contextual environment in which snacks are eaten.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. Electronic address: kloth@umn.edu.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.College of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31669580

Citation

Loth, Katie A., et al. "Ecological Momentary Assessment of the Snacking Environments of Children From Racially/ethnically Diverse Households." Appetite, vol. 145, 2020, p. 104497.
Loth KA, Tate AD, Trofholz A, et al. Ecological momentary assessment of the snacking environments of children from racially/ethnically diverse households. Appetite. 2020;145:104497.
Loth, K. A., Tate, A. D., Trofholz, A., Fisher, J. O., Miller, L., Neumark-Sztainer, D., & Berge, J. M. (2020). Ecological momentary assessment of the snacking environments of children from racially/ethnically diverse households. Appetite, 145, 104497. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2019.104497
Loth KA, et al. Ecological Momentary Assessment of the Snacking Environments of Children From Racially/ethnically Diverse Households. Appetite. 2020 02 1;145:104497. PubMed PMID: 31669580.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ecological momentary assessment of the snacking environments of children from racially/ethnically diverse households. AU - Loth,Katie A, AU - Tate,Allan D, AU - Trofholz,Amanda, AU - Fisher,Jennifer Orlet, AU - Miller,Laura, AU - Neumark-Sztainer,Dianne, AU - Berge,Jerica M, Y1 - 2019/10/25/ PY - 2019/04/01/received PY - 2019/09/05/revised PY - 2019/10/21/accepted PY - 2019/11/2/pubmed PY - 2020/12/19/medline PY - 2019/11/1/entrez KW - Children KW - Cross-sectional KW - Dietary intake KW - Ecological momentary assessment KW - Home environment KW - Nutrition KW - Observational study KW - Snacking SP - 104497 EP - 104497 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 145 N2 - Children consume nearly one-third of their daily energy intake as snacks (i.e., eating occasions that occur between meals); thus there is a growing interest in understanding what snacking occasions look like in the homes of young children. This study makes use of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to 1) examine differences in the contextual factors, including location, food preparation style, people present, presence of media devices, and overall atmosphere, between meal and snack occasions; and 2) explore differences in the context of snacking occasions across children's gender and weight status. Data for the current study came from the Family Matters Study, which included 150 families with children aged 5-7 years old (n = 25 from each of the following groups: Black/African American, Hispanic, Hmong, Native American, Somali, White). Parents completed an 8-day EMA observation period, during which they were surveyed after each eating occasion with the study child; questions explored contextual factors including location, food preparation style, people present, presence of media devices, and the overall atmosphere of each eating occasion. Differences between meals and snacks were observed; a smaller percentage of snacks (compared to meals) were prepared by the parent, consisted of only homemade food, and were planned ahead of time, as opposed to being served in response to a child's request. Snacks were more likely than other meals to be eaten on the couch and in the presence of a screen. Furthermore, important differences in snacking context were observed by child gender and weight status. Findings illuminate opportunities to improve children's overall dietary intake via interventions focused on improving the quality of foods served during snacks, as well as the contextual environment in which snacks are eaten. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31669580/Ecological_momentary_assessment_of_the_snacking_environments_of_children_from_racially/ethnically_diverse_households_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(19)30454-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -