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The mental health and depression of rural-to-urban migrant workers compared to non-migrant workers in Shanghai: a cross-sectional study.
Int Health. 2019 10 31; 11(S1):S55-S63.IH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Migrant workers worldwide commonly are susceptible to mental disorders. Since the 1980s, there has been a large-scale increase in the number of migrant workers in China; this development parallels the acceleration of socio-economic transformation. Studies addressing this population rarely focus on workers' mental health or psychological well-being, yet it is imperative to understand the mental health status of rural-to-urban migrant workers and study the relationship between migration and mental health.

METHODS

A cross-sectional survey of 3286 participants (response rate 85.4%) was conducted among different work units in Shanghai. All of the variables of this survey were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire, with depression measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scale and poor mental health (PMH) measured by the World Health Organization 5-Item Well-Being Index (WHO-5) scale. Pearson's χ2 test and logistic regression were used to compare migrants with urbanites, and to identify factors related to mental health outcomes.

RESULTS

Migrant workers (15.3%) had a slightly higher prevalence of depression than non-migrant (12.0%) workers, with notable PMH (26.9%) among participants >45 y of age. In the logistic regression models, those who reported low job satisfaction, unhealthy organizations, poor physical health (self-rated) and long working hours were 2.86 (95% CI 2.14 to 3.84), 1.42 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.91), 1.89 (95% CI 1.41 to 2.55) and 1.48 (95% CI 1.08 to 2.03) times more likely to have depression, respectively. Similarly, workers >45 y of age were 2.92 (95% CI 1.65 to 5.16) and 1.80 (95% CI 1.01 to 3.21) times more likely to have PMH for low job satisfaction and unhealthy organizations, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

There are numerous potential causes affecting the mental health of Chinese internal migrant workers. Strengthening the construction of healthy organizations and enhancing workers' job satisfaction may improve the mental health status or psychological well-being of this group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health Communication Institute, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 Dong'an Road, Shanghai 200032, China.Health Communication Institute, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 Dong'an Road, Shanghai 200032, China.Health Communication Institute, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 Dong'an Road, Shanghai 200032, China.Health Communication Institute, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 Dong'an Road, Shanghai 200032, China.Health Communication Institute, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 Dong'an Road, Shanghai 200032, China.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31670817

Citation

Li, Zan, et al. "The Mental Health and Depression of Rural-to-urban Migrant Workers Compared to Non-migrant Workers in Shanghai: a Cross-sectional Study." International Health, vol. 11, no. S1, 2019, pp. S55-S63.
Li Z, Dai J, Wu N, et al. The mental health and depression of rural-to-urban migrant workers compared to non-migrant workers in Shanghai: a cross-sectional study. Int Health. 2019;11(S1):S55-S63.
Li, Z., Dai, J., Wu, N., Gao, J., & Fu, H. (2019). The mental health and depression of rural-to-urban migrant workers compared to non-migrant workers in Shanghai: a cross-sectional study. International Health, 11(S1), S55-S63. https://doi.org/10.1093/inthealth/ihz081
Li Z, et al. The Mental Health and Depression of Rural-to-urban Migrant Workers Compared to Non-migrant Workers in Shanghai: a Cross-sectional Study. Int Health. 2019 10 31;11(S1):S55-S63. PubMed PMID: 31670817.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The mental health and depression of rural-to-urban migrant workers compared to non-migrant workers in Shanghai: a cross-sectional study. AU - Li,Zan, AU - Dai,Junming, AU - Wu,Ning, AU - Gao,Junling, AU - Fu,Hua, PY - 2018/12/27/received PY - 2019/06/01/revised PY - 2019/08/08/accepted PY - 2019/11/1/entrez PY - 2019/11/2/pubmed PY - 2020/2/26/medline KW - depression KW - healthy organization KW - migrant workers KW - poor mental health SP - S55 EP - S63 JF - International health JO - Int Health VL - 11 IS - S1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Migrant workers worldwide commonly are susceptible to mental disorders. Since the 1980s, there has been a large-scale increase in the number of migrant workers in China; this development parallels the acceleration of socio-economic transformation. Studies addressing this population rarely focus on workers' mental health or psychological well-being, yet it is imperative to understand the mental health status of rural-to-urban migrant workers and study the relationship between migration and mental health. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of 3286 participants (response rate 85.4%) was conducted among different work units in Shanghai. All of the variables of this survey were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire, with depression measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scale and poor mental health (PMH) measured by the World Health Organization 5-Item Well-Being Index (WHO-5) scale. Pearson's χ2 test and logistic regression were used to compare migrants with urbanites, and to identify factors related to mental health outcomes. RESULTS: Migrant workers (15.3%) had a slightly higher prevalence of depression than non-migrant (12.0%) workers, with notable PMH (26.9%) among participants >45 y of age. In the logistic regression models, those who reported low job satisfaction, unhealthy organizations, poor physical health (self-rated) and long working hours were 2.86 (95% CI 2.14 to 3.84), 1.42 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.91), 1.89 (95% CI 1.41 to 2.55) and 1.48 (95% CI 1.08 to 2.03) times more likely to have depression, respectively. Similarly, workers >45 y of age were 2.92 (95% CI 1.65 to 5.16) and 1.80 (95% CI 1.01 to 3.21) times more likely to have PMH for low job satisfaction and unhealthy organizations, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: There are numerous potential causes affecting the mental health of Chinese internal migrant workers. Strengthening the construction of healthy organizations and enhancing workers' job satisfaction may improve the mental health status or psychological well-being of this group. SN - 1876-3405 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31670817/The_mental_health_and_depression_of_rural_to_urban_migrant_workers_compared_to_non_migrant_workers_in_Shanghai:_a_cross_sectional_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -