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External trigeminal nerve stimulation: Potential rescue treatment for acute vestibular migraine.
J Neurol Sci. 2020 Jan 15; 408:116550.JN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common neurologic cause of vertigo among adults. However, there are no specifically studied or approved rescue therapies for acute VM attacks. This study describes how external trigeminal nerve stimulation (eTNS) using the Cefaly® (CEFALY Technology, Seraing, Belgium) device relieves acute VM episodes.

METHODS

Single-center, retrospective review of 19 patients with acute VM attacks (seen between May 2018 and June 2019) treated with 20-min eTNS. Prior to treatment, patients graded the severity of their vertigo/headache using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) with 0 representing no vertigo/headache, and 10 representing the worst imaginable vertigo/headache. After eTNS, patients graded their vertigo/headache using the same VAS 15 min. In addition, bedside neuro-otologic examination was performed before and after treatment.

RESULTS

19/19 patients reported improvement in vertigo severity. Mean vertigo severity was 6.6 (±2.1; median 7) before eTNS, and 2.7 (±2.6; median 3) following treatment; mean improvement in vertigo was 61.3% (±32.6; median 50.0%). During VM episodes, 14/19 experienced headache. Mean headache severity was 4.8 (±2.4; median 4.5) before eTNS, and was 1.4 (±2.4; median 0) following treatment; mean improvement in headache was 77.2% (±32.7; median 100.0%). Neuro-otologic examination was normal during VM attacks in all except Patient 7 who had spontaneous upbeat nystagmus which resolved after eTNS. Other improvements include improvement of eye pressure, head pressure, and chronic facial pain. No intolerable side effects were reported.

CONCLUSION

This study provides preliminary evidence that eTNS is a novel, non-invasive, safe and effective treatment for acute VM attacks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, United States of America. Electronic address: scjbeh@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31677559

Citation

Beh, Shin C.. "External Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation: Potential Rescue Treatment for Acute Vestibular Migraine." Journal of the Neurological Sciences, vol. 408, 2020, p. 116550.
Beh SC. External trigeminal nerve stimulation: Potential rescue treatment for acute vestibular migraine. J Neurol Sci. 2020;408:116550.
Beh, S. C. (2020). External trigeminal nerve stimulation: Potential rescue treatment for acute vestibular migraine. Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 408, 116550. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2019.116550
Beh SC. External Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation: Potential Rescue Treatment for Acute Vestibular Migraine. J Neurol Sci. 2020 Jan 15;408:116550. PubMed PMID: 31677559.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - External trigeminal nerve stimulation: Potential rescue treatment for acute vestibular migraine. A1 - Beh,Shin C, Y1 - 2019/10/25/ PY - 2019/08/07/received PY - 2019/10/19/revised PY - 2019/10/21/accepted PY - 2019/11/5/pubmed PY - 2021/3/20/medline PY - 2019/11/3/entrez KW - External trigeminal nerve stimulation KW - Migraine KW - Neuromodulation KW - Vertigo KW - Vestibular migraine SP - 116550 EP - 116550 JF - Journal of the neurological sciences JO - J Neurol Sci VL - 408 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common neurologic cause of vertigo among adults. However, there are no specifically studied or approved rescue therapies for acute VM attacks. This study describes how external trigeminal nerve stimulation (eTNS) using the Cefaly® (CEFALY Technology, Seraing, Belgium) device relieves acute VM episodes. METHODS: Single-center, retrospective review of 19 patients with acute VM attacks (seen between May 2018 and June 2019) treated with 20-min eTNS. Prior to treatment, patients graded the severity of their vertigo/headache using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) with 0 representing no vertigo/headache, and 10 representing the worst imaginable vertigo/headache. After eTNS, patients graded their vertigo/headache using the same VAS 15 min. In addition, bedside neuro-otologic examination was performed before and after treatment. RESULTS: 19/19 patients reported improvement in vertigo severity. Mean vertigo severity was 6.6 (±2.1; median 7) before eTNS, and 2.7 (±2.6; median 3) following treatment; mean improvement in vertigo was 61.3% (±32.6; median 50.0%). During VM episodes, 14/19 experienced headache. Mean headache severity was 4.8 (±2.4; median 4.5) before eTNS, and was 1.4 (±2.4; median 0) following treatment; mean improvement in headache was 77.2% (±32.7; median 100.0%). Neuro-otologic examination was normal during VM attacks in all except Patient 7 who had spontaneous upbeat nystagmus which resolved after eTNS. Other improvements include improvement of eye pressure, head pressure, and chronic facial pain. No intolerable side effects were reported. CONCLUSION: This study provides preliminary evidence that eTNS is a novel, non-invasive, safe and effective treatment for acute VM attacks. SN - 1878-5883 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31677559/External_trigeminal_nerve_stimulation:_Potential_rescue_treatment_for_acute_vestibular_migraine_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-510X(19)32314-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -