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Sexual orientation and gender identity disparities in substance use disorders during young adulthood in a United States longitudinal cohort.
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2019 12 01; 205:107619.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This study examined associations of sexual orientation and gender identity with prevalence of substance use disorders (SUDs) and co-occurring multiple SUDs in the past 12-months during young adulthood in a United States longitudinal cohort.

METHODS

Questionnaires self-administered in 2010 and 2015 assessed probable past 12-month nicotine dependence, alcohol abuse and dependence, and drug abuse and dependence among 12,428 participants of an ongoing cohort study when they were ages 20-35 years. Binary or multinomial logistic regressions using generalized estimating equations were used to estimate differences by sexual orientation and gender identity in the odds of SUDs and multiple SUDs, stratified by sex assigned at birth.

RESULTS

Compared with completely heterosexuals (CH), sexual minority (SM; i.e., mostly heterosexual, bisexual, lesbian/gay) participants were generally more likely to have a SUD, including multiple SUDs. Among participants assigned female at birth, adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for SUDs comparing SMs to CHs ranged from 1.61 to 6.97 (ps<.05); among participants assigned male at birth, AORs ranged from 1.30 to 3.08, and were statistically significant for 62% of the estimates. Apart from elevated alcohol dependence among gender minority participants assigned male at birth compared with cisgender males (AOR: 2.30; p < .05), gender identity was not associated with prevalence of SUDs.

CONCLUSIONS

Sexual and gender minority (SGM) young adults disproportionately evidence SUDs, as well as co-occurring multiple SUDs. Findings related to gender identity and bisexuals assigned male at birth should be interpreted with caution due to small sample sizes. SUD prevention and treatment efforts should focus on SGM young adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA; Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA; Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.Wisdom Consulting, New York, NY, USA.Department of Health Policy and Management, School of Public Health, City University of New York, New York, NY, USA.Department of Social and Behavioral Science, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA; Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: hcorliss@sdsu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31678835

Citation

Jun, Hee-Jin, et al. "Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Disparities in Substance Use Disorders During Young Adulthood in a United States Longitudinal Cohort." Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 205, 2019, p. 107619.
Jun HJ, Webb-Morgan M, Felner JK, et al. Sexual orientation and gender identity disparities in substance use disorders during young adulthood in a United States longitudinal cohort. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2019;205:107619.
Jun, H. J., Webb-Morgan, M., Felner, J. K., Wisdom, J. P., Haley, S. J., Austin, S. B., Katuska, L. M., & Corliss, H. L. (2019). Sexual orientation and gender identity disparities in substance use disorders during young adulthood in a United States longitudinal cohort. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 205, 107619. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.107619
Jun HJ, et al. Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Disparities in Substance Use Disorders During Young Adulthood in a United States Longitudinal Cohort. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2019 12 1;205:107619. PubMed PMID: 31678835.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sexual orientation and gender identity disparities in substance use disorders during young adulthood in a United States longitudinal cohort. AU - Jun,Hee-Jin, AU - Webb-Morgan,Megan, AU - Felner,Jennifer K, AU - Wisdom,Jennifer P, AU - Haley,Sean J, AU - Austin,S Bryn, AU - Katuska,Laura M, AU - Corliss,Heather L, Y1 - 2019/10/17/ PY - 2019/02/21/received PY - 2019/08/29/revised PY - 2019/09/04/accepted PY - 2019/11/5/pubmed PY - 2020/7/1/medline PY - 2019/11/4/entrez KW - Gender identity KW - LGBT KW - Longitudinal cohort KW - Sexual orientation KW - Substance use disorders (SUDs) KW - Young adults SP - 107619 EP - 107619 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 205 N2 - BACKGROUND: This study examined associations of sexual orientation and gender identity with prevalence of substance use disorders (SUDs) and co-occurring multiple SUDs in the past 12-months during young adulthood in a United States longitudinal cohort. METHODS: Questionnaires self-administered in 2010 and 2015 assessed probable past 12-month nicotine dependence, alcohol abuse and dependence, and drug abuse and dependence among 12,428 participants of an ongoing cohort study when they were ages 20-35 years. Binary or multinomial logistic regressions using generalized estimating equations were used to estimate differences by sexual orientation and gender identity in the odds of SUDs and multiple SUDs, stratified by sex assigned at birth. RESULTS: Compared with completely heterosexuals (CH), sexual minority (SM; i.e., mostly heterosexual, bisexual, lesbian/gay) participants were generally more likely to have a SUD, including multiple SUDs. Among participants assigned female at birth, adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for SUDs comparing SMs to CHs ranged from 1.61 to 6.97 (ps<.05); among participants assigned male at birth, AORs ranged from 1.30 to 3.08, and were statistically significant for 62% of the estimates. Apart from elevated alcohol dependence among gender minority participants assigned male at birth compared with cisgender males (AOR: 2.30; p < .05), gender identity was not associated with prevalence of SUDs. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual and gender minority (SGM) young adults disproportionately evidence SUDs, as well as co-occurring multiple SUDs. Findings related to gender identity and bisexuals assigned male at birth should be interpreted with caution due to small sample sizes. SUD prevention and treatment efforts should focus on SGM young adults. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31678835/Sexual_orientation_and_gender_identity_disparities_in_substance_use_disorders_during_young_adulthood_in_a_United_States_longitudinal_cohort_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(19)30396-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -