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Conservation evidence from climate-related stressors in the deep-time marine fossil record.
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2019 12 23; 374(1788):20190223.PT

Abstract

Conservation of marine species requires the ability to predict the effects of climate-related stressors in an uncertain future. Experiments and observations in modern settings provide crucial information, but lack temporal scale and cannot anticipate emergent effects during ongoing global change. By contrast, the deep-time fossil record contains the long-term perspective at multiple global change events that can be used, at a broad scale, to test hypothesized effects of climate-related stressors. For example, geologically rapid carbon cycle disruption has often caused crises in reef ecosystems, and selective extinctions support the hypothesis that greater activity levels promote survival. Geographical patterns of extinction and extirpation were more variable than predicted from modern physiology, with tropical and temperate extinction peaks observed at different ancient events. Like any data source, the deep-time record has limitations but also provides opportunities that complement the limitations of modern and historical data. In particular, the deep-time record is the best source of information on actual outcomes of climate-related stressors in natural settings and over evolutionary timescales. Closer integration of modern and deep-time evidence can expand the types of hypotheses testable with the fossil record, yielding better predictions of extinction risk as climate-related stressors continue to intensify in future oceans. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The past is a foreign country: how much can the fossil record actually inform conservation?'

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31679494

Citation

Clapham, Matthew E.. "Conservation Evidence From Climate-related Stressors in the Deep-time Marine Fossil Record." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences, vol. 374, no. 1788, 2019, p. 20190223.
Clapham ME. Conservation evidence from climate-related stressors in the deep-time marine fossil record. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2019;374(1788):20190223.
Clapham, M. E. (2019). Conservation evidence from climate-related stressors in the deep-time marine fossil record. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences, 374(1788), 20190223. https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2019.0223
Clapham ME. Conservation Evidence From Climate-related Stressors in the Deep-time Marine Fossil Record. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2019 12 23;374(1788):20190223. PubMed PMID: 31679494.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Conservation evidence from climate-related stressors in the deep-time marine fossil record. A1 - Clapham,Matthew E, Y1 - 2019/11/04/ PY - 2019/11/5/entrez PY - 2019/11/5/pubmed PY - 2020/7/1/medline KW - climate change KW - conservation palaeobiology KW - mass extinctions KW - ocean acidification KW - palaeontology SP - 20190223 EP - 20190223 JF - Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences JO - Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci VL - 374 IS - 1788 N2 - Conservation of marine species requires the ability to predict the effects of climate-related stressors in an uncertain future. Experiments and observations in modern settings provide crucial information, but lack temporal scale and cannot anticipate emergent effects during ongoing global change. By contrast, the deep-time fossil record contains the long-term perspective at multiple global change events that can be used, at a broad scale, to test hypothesized effects of climate-related stressors. For example, geologically rapid carbon cycle disruption has often caused crises in reef ecosystems, and selective extinctions support the hypothesis that greater activity levels promote survival. Geographical patterns of extinction and extirpation were more variable than predicted from modern physiology, with tropical and temperate extinction peaks observed at different ancient events. Like any data source, the deep-time record has limitations but also provides opportunities that complement the limitations of modern and historical data. In particular, the deep-time record is the best source of information on actual outcomes of climate-related stressors in natural settings and over evolutionary timescales. Closer integration of modern and deep-time evidence can expand the types of hypotheses testable with the fossil record, yielding better predictions of extinction risk as climate-related stressors continue to intensify in future oceans. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The past is a foreign country: how much can the fossil record actually inform conservation?' SN - 1471-2970 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31679494/Conservation_evidence_from_climate_related_stressors_in_the_deep_time_marine_fossil_record_ L2 - https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rstb.2019.0223?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -