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Ankle and knee moment and power adaptations are elicited through load carriage conditioning in males.
J Biomech. 2019 Dec 03; 97:109341.JB

Abstract

Soldiers routinely conduct load carriage and physical training to meet occupational requirements. These tasks are physically arduous and are believed to be the primary cause of musculoskeletal injury. Physical training can help mitigate injury risk when specifically designed to address injury mechanisms and meet task demands. This study aimed to assess lower-limb biomechanics and neuromuscular adaptations during load carriage walking in response to a 10-week evidence-based physical training program. Thirteen male civilian participants donned 23 kg and completed 5 km of load carriage treadmill walking, at 5.5 km h-1 before and after a 10-week physical training program. Three-dimensional motion capture and force plate data were acquired in over-ground walking trials before and after treadmill walking. These data were inputs to a musculoskeletal model which estimated lower-limb joint kinematics and kinetics (i.e., moments and powers) using inverse kinematics and dynamics, respectively. A two-way analysis of variance revealed significant main effect of training for kinematic and kinetics parameters at the knee and ankle joints (p < 0.05). Post-Hoc comparisons demonstrated a significant decrease (4.2%) in total negative knee power between pre- and post-March 5 km measures after training (p < 0.05). Positive power contribution shifted distally after training, increasing at the post-march measure from 39.9% to 43.6% at the ankle joint (p < 0.05). These findings demonstrate that a periodised training program may reduce injury risk through favourable ankle and knee joint adaptations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Professions, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Australia. Electronic address: jodie.wills@hdr.mq.edu.au.Griffith Centre for Biomedical and Rehabilitation Engineering, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University, Australia. Electronic address: d.saxby@griffith.edu.au.Griffith Centre for Biomedical and Rehabilitation Engineering, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, School of Allied Health Sciences, Griffith University, Australia. Electronic address: g.lenton@griffith.edu.au.Department of Health Professions, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Australia. Electronic address: tim.doyle@mq.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31690457

Citation

Wills, Jodie A., et al. "Ankle and Knee Moment and Power Adaptations Are Elicited Through Load Carriage Conditioning in Males." Journal of Biomechanics, vol. 97, 2019, p. 109341.
Wills JA, Saxby DJ, Lenton GK, et al. Ankle and knee moment and power adaptations are elicited through load carriage conditioning in males. J Biomech. 2019;97:109341.
Wills, J. A., Saxby, D. J., Lenton, G. K., & Doyle, T. L. A. (2019). Ankle and knee moment and power adaptations are elicited through load carriage conditioning in males. Journal of Biomechanics, 97, 109341. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2019.109341
Wills JA, et al. Ankle and Knee Moment and Power Adaptations Are Elicited Through Load Carriage Conditioning in Males. J Biomech. 2019 Dec 3;97:109341. PubMed PMID: 31690457.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ankle and knee moment and power adaptations are elicited through load carriage conditioning in males. AU - Wills,Jodie A, AU - Saxby,David J, AU - Lenton,Gavin K, AU - Doyle,Timothy L A, Y1 - 2019/10/08/ PY - 2019/4/21/received PY - 2019/9/8/revised PY - 2019/9/11/accepted PY - 2019/11/7/pubmed PY - 2020/7/25/medline PY - 2019/11/7/entrez KW - Biomechanics KW - Joint mechanics KW - Load carriage KW - Performance KW - Walking SP - 109341 EP - 109341 JF - Journal of biomechanics JO - J Biomech VL - 97 N2 - Soldiers routinely conduct load carriage and physical training to meet occupational requirements. These tasks are physically arduous and are believed to be the primary cause of musculoskeletal injury. Physical training can help mitigate injury risk when specifically designed to address injury mechanisms and meet task demands. This study aimed to assess lower-limb biomechanics and neuromuscular adaptations during load carriage walking in response to a 10-week evidence-based physical training program. Thirteen male civilian participants donned 23 kg and completed 5 km of load carriage treadmill walking, at 5.5 km h-1 before and after a 10-week physical training program. Three-dimensional motion capture and force plate data were acquired in over-ground walking trials before and after treadmill walking. These data were inputs to a musculoskeletal model which estimated lower-limb joint kinematics and kinetics (i.e., moments and powers) using inverse kinematics and dynamics, respectively. A two-way analysis of variance revealed significant main effect of training for kinematic and kinetics parameters at the knee and ankle joints (p < 0.05). Post-Hoc comparisons demonstrated a significant decrease (4.2%) in total negative knee power between pre- and post-March 5 km measures after training (p < 0.05). Positive power contribution shifted distally after training, increasing at the post-march measure from 39.9% to 43.6% at the ankle joint (p < 0.05). These findings demonstrate that a periodised training program may reduce injury risk through favourable ankle and knee joint adaptations. SN - 1873-2380 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31690457/Ankle_and_knee_moment_and_power_adaptations_are_elicited_through_load_carriage_conditioning_in_males_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -