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Effects of commodity on the risk of emphysema in South African miners.

Abstract

PURPOSE

To examine associations between mine commodity such as coal, platinum, or diamonds and emphysema among South African miners at autopsy.

METHODS

We examined the association between mine commodity and emphysema using the Pathology Automation (PATHAUT) database, 1975-2014. Exposure was characterized as longest tenure in each commodity. We constructed separate multivariable logistic regression models for black and white miners. Smoking was assessed in a sub-analysis of white miners.

RESULTS

Among black miners, coal mining was significantly associated with increased odds of emphysema [OR = 2.39 (95% CI 1.86, 3.07)] when compared to gold mining. Asbestos was also associated with significantly increased odds of emphysema among black miners [OR = 1.47 (95% CI 1.01, 2.12)]. No associations between commodity and emphysema were observed among white miners. Cumulative years of exposure and age at death were significant predictors for emphysema for both black and white miners. Smoking was a significant predictor of emphysema in the sub-analysis of white miners with smoking information, but no effect of commodity was observed.

CONCLUSIONS

We observed a significant association between coal mining and emphysema among black miners. Adverse health effects of coal mining are evidenced by more than twofold increase in emphysema among black coal miners compared to gold miners. This suggests that South African Coal miners are exposed to high dust concentrations or more damaging components compared to other commodities, resulting in elevated risk of emphysema.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St (Room 1115), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA. sl.mabila@gmail.com.Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St (Room 1115), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St (Room 1115), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St (Room 1115), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.National Institute of Occupational Health, Johannesburg, South Africa. School of Pathology, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.National Institute of Occupational Health, Johannesburg, South Africa. School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31701235

Citation

Mabila, Sithembile L., et al. "Effects of Commodity On the Risk of Emphysema in South African Miners." International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 2019.
Mabila SL, Almberg KS, Friedman L, et al. Effects of commodity on the risk of emphysema in South African miners. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2019.
Mabila, S. L., Almberg, K. S., Friedman, L., Cohen, R. A., Ndlovu, N., Vorajee, N., & Murray, J. (2019). Effects of commodity on the risk of emphysema in South African miners. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, doi:10.1007/s00420-019-01483-8.
Mabila SL, et al. Effects of Commodity On the Risk of Emphysema in South African Miners. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2019 Nov 7; PubMed PMID: 31701235.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of commodity on the risk of emphysema in South African miners. AU - Mabila,Sithembile L, AU - Almberg,Kirsten S, AU - Friedman,Lee, AU - Cohen,Robert A, AU - Ndlovu,Ntombizodwa, AU - Vorajee,Naseema, AU - Murray,Jill, Y1 - 2019/11/07/ PY - 2019/02/04/received PY - 2019/10/23/accepted PY - 2019/11/9/entrez PY - 2019/11/9/pubmed PY - 2019/11/9/medline KW - Commodity KW - Emphysema KW - Mining KW - Occupation KW - PATHAUT KW - South Africa JF - International archives of occupational and environmental health JO - Int Arch Occup Environ Health N2 - PURPOSE: To examine associations between mine commodity such as coal, platinum, or diamonds and emphysema among South African miners at autopsy. METHODS: We examined the association between mine commodity and emphysema using the Pathology Automation (PATHAUT) database, 1975-2014. Exposure was characterized as longest tenure in each commodity. We constructed separate multivariable logistic regression models for black and white miners. Smoking was assessed in a sub-analysis of white miners. RESULTS: Among black miners, coal mining was significantly associated with increased odds of emphysema [OR = 2.39 (95% CI 1.86, 3.07)] when compared to gold mining. Asbestos was also associated with significantly increased odds of emphysema among black miners [OR = 1.47 (95% CI 1.01, 2.12)]. No associations between commodity and emphysema were observed among white miners. Cumulative years of exposure and age at death were significant predictors for emphysema for both black and white miners. Smoking was a significant predictor of emphysema in the sub-analysis of white miners with smoking information, but no effect of commodity was observed. CONCLUSIONS: We observed a significant association between coal mining and emphysema among black miners. Adverse health effects of coal mining are evidenced by more than twofold increase in emphysema among black coal miners compared to gold miners. This suggests that South African Coal miners are exposed to high dust concentrations or more damaging components compared to other commodities, resulting in elevated risk of emphysema. SN - 1432-1246 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31701235/Effects_of_commodity_on_the_risk_of_emphysema_in_South_African_miners_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00420-019-01483-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -