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The use of canid tooth marks on bone for the identification of livestock predation.
Sci Rep 2019; 9(1):16301SR

Abstract

Historically wolves and humans have had a conflictive relationship which has driven the wolf to extinction in some areas across Northern America and Europe. The last decades have seen a rise of multiple government programs to protect wolf populations. Nevertheless, these programs have been controversial in rural areas, product of the predation of livestock by carnivores. As a response to such issues, governments have presented large scale economic plans to compensate the respected owners. The current issue lies in the lack of reliable techniques that can be used to detect the predator responsible for livestock predation. This has led to complications when obtaining subsidies, creating conflict between landowners and government officials. The objectives of this study therefore are to provide a new alternative approach to differentiating between tooth marks of different predators responsible for livestock predation. Here we present the use of geometric morphometrics and Machine Learning algorithms to discern between different carnivores through in depth analysis of the tooth marks they leave on bone. These results present high classification rates with up to 100% accuracy in some cases, successfully differentiating between wolves, dogs and fox tooth marks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Prehistory, Ancien History and Archaeology, Complutense University, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040, Madrid, Spain. joyravedra@hotmail.com. C.A.I. Arqueometría, Complutense University, Prof. Aranguren s/n, 28040, Madrid, Spain. joyravedra@hotmail.com.Department of Cartographic and Land Engineering, Higher Polytechnic School of Avila, University of Salamanca, Hornos Caleros 50, 05003, Avila, Spain. Gran Duque de Alba Institution, Diputación Provincial de Ávila, Paseo Dos de Mayo, 8, 05001, Ávila, Spain.Department of Cartographic and Land Engineering, Higher Polytechnic School of Avila, University of Salamanca, Hornos Caleros 50, 05003, Avila, Spain. Department of Prehistory, Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), Avinguda de Catalunya 35, 43002, Tarragona, Spain. Institut de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social (IPHES). Zona educacional, Campus Sescelades URV (Edifici W3) E3, 43700, Tarragona, Spain.Department of Cartographic and Land Engineering, Higher Polytechnic School of Avila, University of Salamanca, Hornos Caleros 50, 05003, Avila, Spain.Gran Duque de Alba Institution, Diputación Provincial de Ávila, Paseo Dos de Mayo, 8, 05001, Ávila, Spain. Department Sciences of Communication and Sociology, Faculty of Communication Sciences, University Rey Juan Carlos, Camino del Molino, s/n, 28943, Fuenlabrada, Madrid, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31705057

Citation

Yravedra, José, et al. "The Use of Canid Tooth Marks On Bone for the Identification of Livestock Predation." Scientific Reports, vol. 9, no. 1, 2019, p. 16301.
Yravedra J, Maté-González MÁ, Courtenay LA, et al. The use of canid tooth marks on bone for the identification of livestock predation. Sci Rep. 2019;9(1):16301.
Yravedra, J., Maté-González, M. Á., Courtenay, L. A., González-Aguilera, D., & Fernández, M. F. (2019). The use of canid tooth marks on bone for the identification of livestock predation. Scientific Reports, 9(1), p. 16301. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52807-0.
Yravedra J, et al. The Use of Canid Tooth Marks On Bone for the Identification of Livestock Predation. Sci Rep. 2019 Nov 8;9(1):16301. PubMed PMID: 31705057.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The use of canid tooth marks on bone for the identification of livestock predation. AU - Yravedra,José, AU - Maté-González,Miguel Ángel, AU - Courtenay,Lloyd A, AU - González-Aguilera,Diego, AU - Fernández,Maximiliano Fernández, Y1 - 2019/11/08/ PY - 2019/07/18/received PY - 2019/10/21/accepted PY - 2019/11/10/entrez PY - 2019/11/11/pubmed PY - 2019/11/11/medline SP - 16301 EP - 16301 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - Historically wolves and humans have had a conflictive relationship which has driven the wolf to extinction in some areas across Northern America and Europe. The last decades have seen a rise of multiple government programs to protect wolf populations. Nevertheless, these programs have been controversial in rural areas, product of the predation of livestock by carnivores. As a response to such issues, governments have presented large scale economic plans to compensate the respected owners. The current issue lies in the lack of reliable techniques that can be used to detect the predator responsible for livestock predation. This has led to complications when obtaining subsidies, creating conflict between landowners and government officials. The objectives of this study therefore are to provide a new alternative approach to differentiating between tooth marks of different predators responsible for livestock predation. Here we present the use of geometric morphometrics and Machine Learning algorithms to discern between different carnivores through in depth analysis of the tooth marks they leave on bone. These results present high classification rates with up to 100% accuracy in some cases, successfully differentiating between wolves, dogs and fox tooth marks. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31705057/The_use_of_canid_tooth_marks_on_bone_for_the_identification_of_livestock_predation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-52807-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -