Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Measuring orthorexia nervosa: A comparison of four self-report questionnaires.
Appetite. 2020 03 01; 146:104512.A

Abstract

Orthorexia nervosa is characterized by a preoccupation to eat healthily. However, reliability and validity of some of the existing measures of orthorexic symptomatology are questionable. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to examine internal reliability of and intercorrelations between four of the most popular self-report scales for measuring orthorexia nervosa: Bratman's Orthorexia Test (BOT), the ORTO-15, the Eating Habits Questionnaire (EHQ), and the Düsseldorf Orthorexia Scale (DOS). Five-hundred and eleven adults (63% female) completed all four instruments. Model fit of the originally proposed factor structures of the BOT, DOS, and EHQ was good but was unacceptable for the ORTO-15. Similarly, internal reliability was good for the BOT, EHQ, and DOS, but was unacceptable for the ORTO-15. The BOT, EHQ, and DOS were highly correlated with each other while correlations with the ORTO-15 were of medium size. A subsequent exploratory item analysis suggested that the poor psychometric properties of the ORTO-15 are largely due to the originally proposed scoring procedure. In conclusion, the BOT, EHQ, and DOS are internally reliable instruments that seem to measure the same construct-orthorexic eating behavior. In line with previous suggestions, we conclude that the ORTO-15 cannot be recommended for the measurement of orthorexia nervosa, at least not when the originally proposed scoring procedure is used.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany; Schoen Clinic Roseneck, Prien am Chiemsee, Germany. Electronic address: ameule@med.lmu.de.Institute for Nutritional Medicine, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany.ZIEL - Institute for Food & Health, Technical University of Munich, Freising, Germany.Schoen Clinic Roseneck, Prien am Chiemsee, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany; Schoen Clinic Roseneck, Prien am Chiemsee, Germany.ZIEL - Institute for Food & Health, Technical University of Munich, Freising, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany.Institute for Nutritional Medicine, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany; Chair of Nutritional Medicine, Else Kröner-Fresenius Center for Nutritional Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany; Schoen Clinic Roseneck, Prien am Chiemsee, Germany; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31707072

Citation

Meule, Adrian, et al. "Measuring Orthorexia Nervosa: a Comparison of Four Self-report Questionnaires." Appetite, vol. 146, 2020, p. 104512.
Meule A, Holzapfel C, Brandl B, et al. Measuring orthorexia nervosa: A comparison of four self-report questionnaires. Appetite. 2020;146:104512.
Meule, A., Holzapfel, C., Brandl, B., Greetfeld, M., Hessler-Kaufmann, J. B., Skurk, T., Quadflieg, N., Schlegl, S., Hauner, H., & Voderholzer, U. (2020). Measuring orthorexia nervosa: A comparison of four self-report questionnaires. Appetite, 146, 104512. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2019.104512
Meule A, et al. Measuring Orthorexia Nervosa: a Comparison of Four Self-report Questionnaires. Appetite. 2020 03 1;146:104512. PubMed PMID: 31707072.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Measuring orthorexia nervosa: A comparison of four self-report questionnaires. AU - Meule,Adrian, AU - Holzapfel,Christina, AU - Brandl,Beate, AU - Greetfeld,Martin, AU - Hessler-Kaufmann,Johannes Baltasar, AU - Skurk,Thomas, AU - Quadflieg,Norbert, AU - Schlegl,Sandra, AU - Hauner,Hans, AU - Voderholzer,Ulrich, Y1 - 2019/11/07/ PY - 2019/09/05/received PY - 2019/10/02/revised PY - 2019/11/06/accepted PY - 2019/11/11/pubmed PY - 2021/1/23/medline PY - 2019/11/11/entrez KW - Item analysis KW - Orthorexia KW - Psychometrics KW - Reliability KW - Self-report measures KW - Validity SP - 104512 EP - 104512 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 146 N2 - Orthorexia nervosa is characterized by a preoccupation to eat healthily. However, reliability and validity of some of the existing measures of orthorexic symptomatology are questionable. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to examine internal reliability of and intercorrelations between four of the most popular self-report scales for measuring orthorexia nervosa: Bratman's Orthorexia Test (BOT), the ORTO-15, the Eating Habits Questionnaire (EHQ), and the Düsseldorf Orthorexia Scale (DOS). Five-hundred and eleven adults (63% female) completed all four instruments. Model fit of the originally proposed factor structures of the BOT, DOS, and EHQ was good but was unacceptable for the ORTO-15. Similarly, internal reliability was good for the BOT, EHQ, and DOS, but was unacceptable for the ORTO-15. The BOT, EHQ, and DOS were highly correlated with each other while correlations with the ORTO-15 were of medium size. A subsequent exploratory item analysis suggested that the poor psychometric properties of the ORTO-15 are largely due to the originally proposed scoring procedure. In conclusion, the BOT, EHQ, and DOS are internally reliable instruments that seem to measure the same construct-orthorexic eating behavior. In line with previous suggestions, we conclude that the ORTO-15 cannot be recommended for the measurement of orthorexia nervosa, at least not when the originally proposed scoring procedure is used. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31707072/Measuring_orthorexia_nervosa:_A_comparison_of_four_self_report_questionnaires_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(19)31145-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -