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Resource Use and Outcomes for Children Hospitalized With Severe Sepsis or Septic Shock.
J Intensive Care Med. 2021 Jan; 36(1):89-100.JI

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe patient and hospital characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS), and charges for children with severe sepsis or septic shock who often require specialized organ-supportive technology to enhance outcomes, availability of which might vary across hospitals.

DESIGN

Retrospective study among children hospitalized for severe sepsis or septic shock, using the 2012 Kids' Inpatient Database. Multivariate regression methods identified factors associated with mortality, LOS, and charges.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS

Of an estimated 11 972 hospitalizations for pediatric severe sepsis or septic shock, most hospitalizations (85%) were to urban teaching hospitals. Hospitalizations were more frequent among neonates and older adolescents than other age groups. Mortality was 17%, average LOS was 24 days, and average hospital charges were US$314 950. Higher mortality was associated with neonates, cumulative organ dysfunction, more comorbidities, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Longer hospitalization and higher charges were associated with neonates, more comorbidities, higher illness severity, invasive medical technology, and urban hospitals.

CONCLUSIONS

Efforts to mitigate the substantial in-hospital mortality and resource use observed in pediatric severe sepsis or septic shock should be age-specific and focused on the influence of comorbidities and organ dysfunction on outcomes. Future research should elucidate reasons for higher resource use at urban hospitals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Child Health Evaluation and Research Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31707898

Citation

Odetola, Folafoluwa O., and Achamyeleh Gebremariam. "Resource Use and Outcomes for Children Hospitalized With Severe Sepsis or Septic Shock." Journal of Intensive Care Medicine, vol. 36, no. 1, 2021, pp. 89-100.
Odetola FO, Gebremariam A. Resource Use and Outcomes for Children Hospitalized With Severe Sepsis or Septic Shock. J Intensive Care Med. 2021;36(1):89-100.
Odetola, F. O., & Gebremariam, A. (2021). Resource Use and Outcomes for Children Hospitalized With Severe Sepsis or Septic Shock. Journal of Intensive Care Medicine, 36(1), 89-100. https://doi.org/10.1177/0885066619885894
Odetola FO, Gebremariam A. Resource Use and Outcomes for Children Hospitalized With Severe Sepsis or Septic Shock. J Intensive Care Med. 2021;36(1):89-100. PubMed PMID: 31707898.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Resource Use and Outcomes for Children Hospitalized With Severe Sepsis or Septic Shock. AU - Odetola,Folafoluwa O, AU - Gebremariam,Achamyeleh, Y1 - 2019/11/10/ PY - 2019/11/12/pubmed PY - 2019/11/12/medline PY - 2019/11/12/entrez KW - hospital charges KW - hospitalized children KW - length of stay KW - mortality KW - sepsis KW - teaching hospitals SP - 89 EP - 100 JF - Journal of intensive care medicine JO - J Intensive Care Med VL - 36 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe patient and hospital characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS), and charges for children with severe sepsis or septic shock who often require specialized organ-supportive technology to enhance outcomes, availability of which might vary across hospitals. DESIGN: Retrospective study among children hospitalized for severe sepsis or septic shock, using the 2012 Kids' Inpatient Database. Multivariate regression methods identified factors associated with mortality, LOS, and charges. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Of an estimated 11 972 hospitalizations for pediatric severe sepsis or septic shock, most hospitalizations (85%) were to urban teaching hospitals. Hospitalizations were more frequent among neonates and older adolescents than other age groups. Mortality was 17%, average LOS was 24 days, and average hospital charges were US$314 950. Higher mortality was associated with neonates, cumulative organ dysfunction, more comorbidities, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Longer hospitalization and higher charges were associated with neonates, more comorbidities, higher illness severity, invasive medical technology, and urban hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to mitigate the substantial in-hospital mortality and resource use observed in pediatric severe sepsis or septic shock should be age-specific and focused on the influence of comorbidities and organ dysfunction on outcomes. Future research should elucidate reasons for higher resource use at urban hospitals. SN - 1525-1489 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31707898/Resource_Use_and_Outcomes_for_Children_Hospitalized_With_Severe_Sepsis_or_Septic_Shock_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0885066619885894?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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