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Elated or sad mood induction affects the attention of patients with a bipolar disorder less than that of patients with a depressive disorder.
Cogn Neuropsychiatry 2019; :1-14CN

Abstract

Introduction: The role of acute mood states as mediating factors in cognitive impairment in patients with mania or depression is not sufficiently clear. Similarly, the extent to which cognitive impairment is trait or state-specific remains an open question. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a mood-induction on attention in patients with an affective disorder.

Methods:

Twenty-two depressed bipolar patients, 10 manic bipolar patients, 17 with a depressive episode (MDE), and 24 healthy controls performed the Attention-Network-Test (ANT). In a within-participants design, elated and sad moods were induced by an autobiographic recall and measured on a self-report scale. Subsequently, participants performed the ANT again.

Results:

The modulating effect of the elated mood induction on attention was small. Only the MDE group displayed moderate improvements in selective attention and tonic alertness. Surprisingly, after the sad mood induction, patients with MDE improved moderately on phasic and tonic alertness. Phasic alertness was also enhanced in patients with mania. Finally, after the mood induction, patients with MDE showed the largest variability in attentional performance.

Conclusions:

Results showed only small effects of mood induction on attention. This supports the view that attention deficits reflect trait variables.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University Hospital RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.Ambulanz und Tagesklinik für Psychiatrie, Psychotherapie und Psychosomatik, Fliedner Klinik, Berlin, Germany.Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University Hospital RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University Hospital RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University Hospital RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31707921

Citation

Drueke, Barbara, et al. "Elated or Sad Mood Induction Affects the Attention of Patients With a Bipolar Disorder Less Than That of Patients With a Depressive Disorder." Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 2019, pp. 1-14.
Drueke B, Gruber S, Boecker M, et al. Elated or sad mood induction affects the attention of patients with a bipolar disorder less than that of patients with a depressive disorder. Cogn Neuropsychiatry. 2019.
Drueke, B., Gruber, S., Boecker, M., Gauggel, S., & Mainz, V. (2019). Elated or sad mood induction affects the attention of patients with a bipolar disorder less than that of patients with a depressive disorder. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, pp. 1-14. doi:10.1080/13546805.2019.1688653.
Drueke B, et al. Elated or Sad Mood Induction Affects the Attention of Patients With a Bipolar Disorder Less Than That of Patients With a Depressive Disorder. Cogn Neuropsychiatry. 2019 Nov 10;1-14. PubMed PMID: 31707921.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Elated or sad mood induction affects the attention of patients with a bipolar disorder less than that of patients with a depressive disorder. AU - Drueke,Barbara, AU - Gruber,Susan, AU - Boecker,Maren, AU - Gauggel,Siegfried, AU - Mainz,Verena, Y1 - 2019/11/10/ PY - 2019/11/12/entrez KW - Affect KW - affective disorders KW - attention KW - modulation KW - mood induction SP - 1 EP - 14 JF - Cognitive neuropsychiatry JO - Cogn Neuropsychiatry N2 - Introduction: The role of acute mood states as mediating factors in cognitive impairment in patients with mania or depression is not sufficiently clear. Similarly, the extent to which cognitive impairment is trait or state-specific remains an open question. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a mood-induction on attention in patients with an affective disorder.Methods: Twenty-two depressed bipolar patients, 10 manic bipolar patients, 17 with a depressive episode (MDE), and 24 healthy controls performed the Attention-Network-Test (ANT). In a within-participants design, elated and sad moods were induced by an autobiographic recall and measured on a self-report scale. Subsequently, participants performed the ANT again.Results: The modulating effect of the elated mood induction on attention was small. Only the MDE group displayed moderate improvements in selective attention and tonic alertness. Surprisingly, after the sad mood induction, patients with MDE improved moderately on phasic and tonic alertness. Phasic alertness was also enhanced in patients with mania. Finally, after the mood induction, patients with MDE showed the largest variability in attentional performance.Conclusions: Results showed only small effects of mood induction on attention. This supports the view that attention deficits reflect trait variables. SN - 1464-0619 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31707921/Elated_or_sad_mood_induction_affects_the_attention_of_patients_with_a_bipolar_disorder_less_than_that_of_patients_with_a_depressive_disorder L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13546805.2019.1688653 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -