Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The contribution of enrichment and fortification to nutrient intake of women.
J Am Diet Assoc. 1988 Oct; 88(10):1237-42, 1245.JA

Abstract

A volunteer group of 162 women aged 25 to 49 years was recruited from three suburban supermarkets in central New York state. The women completed 3-day food records, which were analyzed for total nutrient intake and contribution of eight nutrients from three sources: (a) nutrients naturally present in food, (b) enriched/fortified foods with a standard of identity (FF + SI), and (c) fortified foods without standards of identity (FF-SI). Subjects were placed into study groups of high-, moderate-, and low-fortifiers on the basis of frequency of intake of highly fortified foods (FF-SI) which, unlike FF + SI, are not staple foods and may represent selective dietary nutrient addition by the consumer. For all groups, mean intakes of riboflavin, niacin, and vitamins A and C were greater than 100% of the RDAs without nutrient addition. Mean thiamin intake met the RDA only when the nutrient addition from FF + SI was included. Mean intakes of iron, calcium, and vitamin D were all below the RDA even when all sources of intake were included. No significant differences between study groups were found for total nutrient intake. With the exceptions of vitamin C, vitamin D, and calcium, high- and moderate-fortifiers had significantly greater (p less than .01) nutrient intake from fortification. Low-fortifiers had significantly greater (p less than .05) intake from naturally occurring vitamins A and C than high-fortifiers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-4200.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3171016

Citation

Subar, A F., and J Bowering. "The Contribution of Enrichment and Fortification to Nutrient Intake of Women." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 88, no. 10, 1988, pp. 1237-42, 1245.
Subar AF, Bowering J. The contribution of enrichment and fortification to nutrient intake of women. J Am Diet Assoc. 1988;88(10):1237-42, 1245.
Subar, A. F., & Bowering, J. (1988). The contribution of enrichment and fortification to nutrient intake of women. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 88(10), 1237-42, 1245.
Subar AF, Bowering J. The Contribution of Enrichment and Fortification to Nutrient Intake of Women. J Am Diet Assoc. 1988;88(10):1237-42, 1245. PubMed PMID: 3171016.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The contribution of enrichment and fortification to nutrient intake of women. AU - Subar,A F, AU - Bowering,J, PY - 1988/10/1/pubmed PY - 1988/10/1/medline PY - 1988/10/1/entrez SP - 1237-42, 1245 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 88 IS - 10 N2 - A volunteer group of 162 women aged 25 to 49 years was recruited from three suburban supermarkets in central New York state. The women completed 3-day food records, which were analyzed for total nutrient intake and contribution of eight nutrients from three sources: (a) nutrients naturally present in food, (b) enriched/fortified foods with a standard of identity (FF + SI), and (c) fortified foods without standards of identity (FF-SI). Subjects were placed into study groups of high-, moderate-, and low-fortifiers on the basis of frequency of intake of highly fortified foods (FF-SI) which, unlike FF + SI, are not staple foods and may represent selective dietary nutrient addition by the consumer. For all groups, mean intakes of riboflavin, niacin, and vitamins A and C were greater than 100% of the RDAs without nutrient addition. Mean thiamin intake met the RDA only when the nutrient addition from FF + SI was included. Mean intakes of iron, calcium, and vitamin D were all below the RDA even when all sources of intake were included. No significant differences between study groups were found for total nutrient intake. With the exceptions of vitamin C, vitamin D, and calcium, high- and moderate-fortifiers had significantly greater (p less than .01) nutrient intake from fortification. Low-fortifiers had significantly greater (p less than .05) intake from naturally occurring vitamins A and C than high-fortifiers. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3171016/The_contribution_of_enrichment_and_fortification_to_nutrient_intake_of_women_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/minerals.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -