Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Fracture force of CAD/CAM resin composite crowns after in vitro aging.
Clin Oral Investig. 2020 Jul; 24(7):2395-2401.CO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of material, preparation, and pre-treatment on the aging and fracture force of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

CAD/CAM molar crowns (n = 80) were milled from four resin composites (Block HC, Shofu; Lava Ultimate, 3 M; Grandio Blocs, Voco; and Tetric CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent, with/without sandblasting). Extracted human teeth were prepared with optimal preparation (height 6-8 mm, angle 6-8°) or worst-case preparation (height 3.5-4 mm, angle 10-15°). Both groups were prepared with a 1-mm deep cervical circular shoulder. Crowns were adhesively bonded after corresponding tooth treatment required for the individual adhesive systems (Table 1). Specimens were aged for 90 days in water storage (37 °C) and subsequently subjected to thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML 3000 × 5 °C/3000 × 55 °C, 2 min each cycle, H20 distilled; 1.2 × 106 cycles à 50 N, 1.6 Hz). De-bonding and fracture force was determined.

STATISTICS

one-way-ANOVA; post hoc Bonferroni, α = 0.05.

RESULTS

Four crowns of Lava Ultimate with worst-case preparation de-bonded during TCML. Individual crowns without sandblasting treatment (3x Tetric CAD with optimal preparation; 1x Tetric CAD with worst-case preparation) de-bonded during water storage. One crown of Grandio Blocs with optimal preparation showed a small chipping during TCML. All other crowns survived TCML and water storage without failure. Fracture forces differed between 1272 ± 211 N (Lava Ultimate) and 3061 ± 521 N (Tetric CAD). All Grandio Blocs and Tetric CAD crowns revealed significantly (p ≤ 0.023) higher fracture forces than Block HC or Lava Ultimate crowns. No significantly different (p > 0.05) fracture forces were found between optimal or worst-case preparation/fit groups.

CONCLUSIONS

De-bonding during water storage and TCML was dependent on material and crown pre-treatment. Therefore, surface roughening seems strongly required. Fracture forces were not influenced by preparation but by the type of material.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Clinical success and de-bonding of CAD/CAM resin composite crowns is strongly influenced by the type of material and its pre-treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, UKR University Hospital Regensburg, 93042, Regensburg, Germany. martin.rosentritt@ukr.de.Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, UKR University Hospital Regensburg, 93042, Regensburg, Germany.Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, UKR University Hospital Regensburg, 93042, Regensburg, Germany.Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, UKR University Hospital Regensburg, 93042, Regensburg, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31712983

Citation

Rosentritt, Martin, et al. "Fracture Force of CAD/CAM Resin Composite Crowns After in Vitro Aging." Clinical Oral Investigations, vol. 24, no. 7, 2020, pp. 2395-2401.
Rosentritt M, Krifka S, Strasser T, et al. Fracture force of CAD/CAM resin composite crowns after in vitro aging. Clin Oral Investig. 2020;24(7):2395-2401.
Rosentritt, M., Krifka, S., Strasser, T., & Preis, V. (2020). Fracture force of CAD/CAM resin composite crowns after in vitro aging. Clinical Oral Investigations, 24(7), 2395-2401. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-019-03099-1
Rosentritt M, et al. Fracture Force of CAD/CAM Resin Composite Crowns After in Vitro Aging. Clin Oral Investig. 2020;24(7):2395-2401. PubMed PMID: 31712983.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fracture force of CAD/CAM resin composite crowns after in vitro aging. AU - Rosentritt,Martin, AU - Krifka,Stefanie, AU - Strasser,Thomas, AU - Preis,Verena, Y1 - 2019/11/11/ PY - 2019/04/03/received PY - 2019/09/26/accepted PY - 2019/11/13/pubmed PY - 2020/11/3/medline PY - 2019/11/13/entrez KW - Aging KW - CAD/CAM KW - CAD/CAM bloc KW - Dental material KW - Fit KW - Preparation KW - Resin composite KW - Resin-based material KW - Storage KW - TCML SP - 2395 EP - 2401 JF - Clinical oral investigations JO - Clin Oral Investig VL - 24 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of material, preparation, and pre-treatment on the aging and fracture force of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CAD/CAM molar crowns (n = 80) were milled from four resin composites (Block HC, Shofu; Lava Ultimate, 3 M; Grandio Blocs, Voco; and Tetric CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent, with/without sandblasting). Extracted human teeth were prepared with optimal preparation (height 6-8 mm, angle 6-8°) or worst-case preparation (height 3.5-4 mm, angle 10-15°). Both groups were prepared with a 1-mm deep cervical circular shoulder. Crowns were adhesively bonded after corresponding tooth treatment required for the individual adhesive systems (Table 1). Specimens were aged for 90 days in water storage (37 °C) and subsequently subjected to thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML 3000 × 5 °C/3000 × 55 °C, 2 min each cycle, H20 distilled; 1.2 × 106 cycles à 50 N, 1.6 Hz). De-bonding and fracture force was determined. STATISTICS: one-way-ANOVA; post hoc Bonferroni, α = 0.05. RESULTS: Four crowns of Lava Ultimate with worst-case preparation de-bonded during TCML. Individual crowns without sandblasting treatment (3x Tetric CAD with optimal preparation; 1x Tetric CAD with worst-case preparation) de-bonded during water storage. One crown of Grandio Blocs with optimal preparation showed a small chipping during TCML. All other crowns survived TCML and water storage without failure. Fracture forces differed between 1272 ± 211 N (Lava Ultimate) and 3061 ± 521 N (Tetric CAD). All Grandio Blocs and Tetric CAD crowns revealed significantly (p ≤ 0.023) higher fracture forces than Block HC or Lava Ultimate crowns. No significantly different (p > 0.05) fracture forces were found between optimal or worst-case preparation/fit groups. CONCLUSIONS: De-bonding during water storage and TCML was dependent on material and crown pre-treatment. Therefore, surface roughening seems strongly required. Fracture forces were not influenced by preparation but by the type of material. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Clinical success and de-bonding of CAD/CAM resin composite crowns is strongly influenced by the type of material and its pre-treatment. SN - 1436-3771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31712983/Fracture_force_of_CAD/CAM_resin_composite_crowns_after_in_vitro_aging_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -