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An adhesive locomotion model for the rock-climbing fish, Beaufortia kweichowensis.
Sci Rep 2019; 9(1):16571SR

Abstract

The rock-climbing fish (Beaufortia kweichowensis) adheres to slippery, fouled surfaces and crawls both forward and backward in torrential streams. During locomotion, two suckers can be distinguished. Here, the general skeletal structure of the rock-climbing fish was determined using microtomography. Friction and adhesion were positively correlated, as were friction and fin ray angle. The unique adhesive locomotion system used by the rock-climbing fish was observed with a high speed camera. This system comprised two anisotropic suckers bearing two paired fins and two girdle muscles. A locomotion model was established based on these results. In this model, the fin states controlled the direction of motion using anisotropic friction, and alternate contractions of the girdle muscles provided propulsion during bidirectional crawling. This adhesive locomotion system was compared with other biological locomotion mechanisms. Based on these comparisons, we hypothesized that this novel system might represent an energy-saving solution for undulatory underwater vertical movement without detaching from the substrate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China.Institute of Marine Science and Technology, Shandong University, Qingdao, 266237, China.State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China.State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China. junzou@zju.edu.cn.State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China.Center for Power Transmission and Motion Control, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31719624

Citation

Wang, Jinrong, et al. "An Adhesive Locomotion Model for the Rock-climbing Fish, Beaufortia Kweichowensis." Scientific Reports, vol. 9, no. 1, 2019, p. 16571.
Wang J, Ji C, Wang W, et al. An adhesive locomotion model for the rock-climbing fish, Beaufortia kweichowensis. Sci Rep. 2019;9(1):16571.
Wang, J., Ji, C., Wang, W., Zou, J., Yang, H., & Pan, M. (2019). An adhesive locomotion model for the rock-climbing fish, Beaufortia kweichowensis. Scientific Reports, 9(1), p. 16571. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53027-2.
Wang J, et al. An Adhesive Locomotion Model for the Rock-climbing Fish, Beaufortia Kweichowensis. Sci Rep. 2019 Nov 12;9(1):16571. PubMed PMID: 31719624.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An adhesive locomotion model for the rock-climbing fish, Beaufortia kweichowensis. AU - Wang,Jinrong, AU - Ji,Chen, AU - Wang,Wei, AU - Zou,Jun, AU - Yang,Huayong, AU - Pan,Min, Y1 - 2019/11/12/ PY - 2019/01/28/received PY - 2019/10/28/accepted PY - 2019/11/14/entrez PY - 2019/11/14/pubmed PY - 2019/11/14/medline SP - 16571 EP - 16571 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - The rock-climbing fish (Beaufortia kweichowensis) adheres to slippery, fouled surfaces and crawls both forward and backward in torrential streams. During locomotion, two suckers can be distinguished. Here, the general skeletal structure of the rock-climbing fish was determined using microtomography. Friction and adhesion were positively correlated, as were friction and fin ray angle. The unique adhesive locomotion system used by the rock-climbing fish was observed with a high speed camera. This system comprised two anisotropic suckers bearing two paired fins and two girdle muscles. A locomotion model was established based on these results. In this model, the fin states controlled the direction of motion using anisotropic friction, and alternate contractions of the girdle muscles provided propulsion during bidirectional crawling. This adhesive locomotion system was compared with other biological locomotion mechanisms. Based on these comparisons, we hypothesized that this novel system might represent an energy-saving solution for undulatory underwater vertical movement without detaching from the substrate. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31719624/An_adhesive_locomotion_model_for_the_rock-climbing_fish,_Beaufortia_kweichowensis L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-53027-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -