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Alcohol consumption and survival after breast cancer diagnosis in Japanese women: A prospective patient cohort study.
PLoS One. 2019; 14(11):e0224797.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is unclear whether alcohol consumption may impact survival after breast cancer diagnosis. To clarify the association between pretreatment alcohol consumption and survival in breast cancer patients, a prospective patient cohort study was conducted.

METHODS

The cohort comprised 1,420 breast cancer patients diagnosed during 1997-2013 at a single institute in Japan. Alcohol drinking and other lifestyle factors were assessed by questionnaire survey at the initial admission. The patients were followed until December 31, 2016. The crude associations of pretreatment alcohol intake with survival were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) controlled by confounders.

RESULTS

During a median follow-up period of 8.6 years, 261 all-cause and 193 breast cancer-specific deaths were documented. Survival curves showed that ever-drinkers tended to have better survival than never-drinkers (breast cancer-specific survival, log-rank p = 0.0381). Better survival was also observed for light drinkers with an intake of <5.0 g per day. In the Cox model, ever-drinking was associated with a decreased risk of all-cause (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.54-1.05) and breast cancer-specific death (HR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.46-0.99). Light drinkers had a lower risk of breast cancer-specific death (frequency of drinking, HR = 0.57 for occasional or 1-2 times per week and 0.72 for 3-7 times per week; amount of alcohol consumed per day, HR = 0.57 for <5.0 g and 0.68 for ≥5.0 g compared with never-drinking). In terms of hormone receptor status, a significantly decreased risk of death associated with ever-drinking was observed among women with receptor-negative cancer (ER-/PR-, HR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.20-0.84 for breast cancer-specific death).

CONCLUSIONS

Pretreatment, i.e., pre-diagnosis alcohol consumption is unlikely to have an adverse effect on survival after breast cancer diagnosis. Light alcohol consumption may have a beneficial effect on patient survival.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Community Health, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan. Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori, Miyagi, Japan. Center for Preventive Medicine, Osaki Citizen Hospital, Osaki, Miyagi, Japan.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori, Miyagi, Japan.Department of Breast Surgery, Miyagi Cancer Center Hospital, Natori, Miyagi, Japan.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori, Miyagi, Japan. Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Kahoku, Ishikawa, Japan.Department of Breast Surgery, Miyagi Cancer Center Hospital, Natori, Miyagi, Japan.Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgical Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgical Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.Department of Breast Surgery, Miyagi Cancer Center Hospital, Natori, Miyagi, Japan. Department of Surgery, Japanese Red Cross Sendai Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31721806

Citation

Minami, Yuko, et al. "Alcohol Consumption and Survival After Breast Cancer Diagnosis in Japanese Women: a Prospective Patient Cohort Study." PloS One, vol. 14, no. 11, 2019, pp. e0224797.
Minami Y, Kanemura S, Kawai M, et al. Alcohol consumption and survival after breast cancer diagnosis in Japanese women: A prospective patient cohort study. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(11):e0224797.
Minami, Y., Kanemura, S., Kawai, M., Nishino, Y., Tada, H., Miyashita, M., Ishida, T., & Kakugawa, Y. (2019). Alcohol consumption and survival after breast cancer diagnosis in Japanese women: A prospective patient cohort study. PloS One, 14(11), e0224797. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0224797
Minami Y, et al. Alcohol Consumption and Survival After Breast Cancer Diagnosis in Japanese Women: a Prospective Patient Cohort Study. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(11):e0224797. PubMed PMID: 31721806.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption and survival after breast cancer diagnosis in Japanese women: A prospective patient cohort study. AU - Minami,Yuko, AU - Kanemura,Seiki, AU - Kawai,Masaaki, AU - Nishino,Yoshikazu, AU - Tada,Hiroshi, AU - Miyashita,Minoru, AU - Ishida,Takanori, AU - Kakugawa,Yoichiro, Y1 - 2019/11/13/ PY - 2019/06/19/received PY - 2019/10/10/accepted PY - 2019/11/14/entrez PY - 2019/11/14/pubmed PY - 2020/3/18/medline SP - e0224797 EP - e0224797 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 14 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether alcohol consumption may impact survival after breast cancer diagnosis. To clarify the association between pretreatment alcohol consumption and survival in breast cancer patients, a prospective patient cohort study was conducted. METHODS: The cohort comprised 1,420 breast cancer patients diagnosed during 1997-2013 at a single institute in Japan. Alcohol drinking and other lifestyle factors were assessed by questionnaire survey at the initial admission. The patients were followed until December 31, 2016. The crude associations of pretreatment alcohol intake with survival were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) controlled by confounders. RESULTS: During a median follow-up period of 8.6 years, 261 all-cause and 193 breast cancer-specific deaths were documented. Survival curves showed that ever-drinkers tended to have better survival than never-drinkers (breast cancer-specific survival, log-rank p = 0.0381). Better survival was also observed for light drinkers with an intake of <5.0 g per day. In the Cox model, ever-drinking was associated with a decreased risk of all-cause (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.54-1.05) and breast cancer-specific death (HR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.46-0.99). Light drinkers had a lower risk of breast cancer-specific death (frequency of drinking, HR = 0.57 for occasional or 1-2 times per week and 0.72 for 3-7 times per week; amount of alcohol consumed per day, HR = 0.57 for <5.0 g and 0.68 for ≥5.0 g compared with never-drinking). In terms of hormone receptor status, a significantly decreased risk of death associated with ever-drinking was observed among women with receptor-negative cancer (ER-/PR-, HR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.20-0.84 for breast cancer-specific death). CONCLUSIONS: Pretreatment, i.e., pre-diagnosis alcohol consumption is unlikely to have an adverse effect on survival after breast cancer diagnosis. Light alcohol consumption may have a beneficial effect on patient survival. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31721806/Alcohol_consumption_and_survival_after_breast_cancer_diagnosis_in_Japanese_women:_A_prospective_patient_cohort_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -