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Anticipatory postural control differs between low back pain and pelvic girdle pain patients in the absence of visual feedback.
Hum Mov Sci 2019; 69:102529HM

Abstract

PURPOSE

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of vision on anticipatory postural control (APA) responses in two groups of clinically diagnosed chronic low back pain patients, those with Posterior Pelvic Girdle pain and those with Non-Specific Low Back Pain compared to a matched group of healthy controls during the modified Trendelenburg task.

METHODS

Seventy-eight volunteer participants (60 females and 18 males) gave informed consent to take part in this study. 39 with confirmed LBP or PGP lasting longer than 12 weeks and 39 healthy matched controls performed 40 single leg lift tasks (hip flexion to 90° as quickly as possible) with their non-dominant lower limb. A force plate was used to determine the medial-lateral displacement of the center of pressure, and the initiation of weight shift; kinematics was used to determine initiation of leg lift; and electromyography was used to determine onset times from the external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO) and lumbar multifidus (MF), gluteus maximus (GM) and biceps femoris (BF).

RESULTS

The PGP group showed significantly longer muscle onset latencies in the BF, EO MF with visual occlusion (F2,746 = 4.51, p < .0001).

CONCLUSION

The muscle onset delays identified between the two LBP sub-groups suggests that pain may not be the primary factor in alteration of APA response. The PGP group show a greater reliance on vision which may signal impairment in multiple feedback channels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin 9013, New Zealand. Electronic address: melanie.bussey@otago.ac.nz.Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin 9013, New Zealand. Electronic address: daniela.aldabe@otago.ac.nz.Neural Control of Movement Lab, Medical and Exercise Science, School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Australia. Electronic address: shemmell@uow.edu.au.Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Otago, Dunedin 9013, New Zealand. Electronic address: tjowett@maths.otago.ac.nz.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31726292

Citation

Bussey, Melanie D., et al. "Anticipatory Postural Control Differs Between Low Back Pain and Pelvic Girdle Pain Patients in the Absence of Visual Feedback." Human Movement Science, vol. 69, 2019, p. 102529.
Bussey MD, Aldabe D, Shemmell J, et al. Anticipatory postural control differs between low back pain and pelvic girdle pain patients in the absence of visual feedback. Hum Mov Sci. 2019;69:102529.
Bussey, M. D., Aldabe, D., Shemmell, J., & Jowett, T. (2019). Anticipatory postural control differs between low back pain and pelvic girdle pain patients in the absence of visual feedback. Human Movement Science, 69, p. 102529. doi:10.1016/j.humov.2019.102529.
Bussey MD, et al. Anticipatory Postural Control Differs Between Low Back Pain and Pelvic Girdle Pain Patients in the Absence of Visual Feedback. Hum Mov Sci. 2019 Nov 11;69:102529. PubMed PMID: 31726292.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anticipatory postural control differs between low back pain and pelvic girdle pain patients in the absence of visual feedback. AU - Bussey,Melanie D, AU - Aldabe,Daniela, AU - Shemmell,Jonathan, AU - Jowett,Tim, Y1 - 2019/11/11/ PY - 2018/12/12/received PY - 2019/10/06/revised PY - 2019/10/06/accepted PY - 2019/11/15/pubmed PY - 2019/11/15/medline PY - 2019/11/15/entrez KW - Anticipatory postural adjustments KW - Feed-forward KW - Low back pain KW - Pelvic girdle pain KW - Posture SP - 102529 EP - 102529 JF - Human movement science JO - Hum Mov Sci VL - 69 N2 - PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of vision on anticipatory postural control (APA) responses in two groups of clinically diagnosed chronic low back pain patients, those with Posterior Pelvic Girdle pain and those with Non-Specific Low Back Pain compared to a matched group of healthy controls during the modified Trendelenburg task. METHODS: Seventy-eight volunteer participants (60 females and 18 males) gave informed consent to take part in this study. 39 with confirmed LBP or PGP lasting longer than 12 weeks and 39 healthy matched controls performed 40 single leg lift tasks (hip flexion to 90° as quickly as possible) with their non-dominant lower limb. A force plate was used to determine the medial-lateral displacement of the center of pressure, and the initiation of weight shift; kinematics was used to determine initiation of leg lift; and electromyography was used to determine onset times from the external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO) and lumbar multifidus (MF), gluteus maximus (GM) and biceps femoris (BF). RESULTS: The PGP group showed significantly longer muscle onset latencies in the BF, EO MF with visual occlusion (F2,746 = 4.51, p < .0001). CONCLUSION: The muscle onset delays identified between the two LBP sub-groups suggests that pain may not be the primary factor in alteration of APA response. The PGP group show a greater reliance on vision which may signal impairment in multiple feedback channels. SN - 1872-7646 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31726292/Anticipatory_postural_control_differs_between_low_back_pain_and_pelvic_girdle_pain_patients_in_the_absence_of_visual_feedback L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-9457(18)30859-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -